Each semester, the program publishes a list of pre-approved courses that fulfill major or concentration requirements as well as a list of additional courses of potential interest. Courses that are not on the pre-approved list may also be approved for the degree if the student can demonstrate that he or she can complete substantial coursework specifically focusing on human rights in that course.

The following course list is subject to change upon receipt of additional course information. If you would like to suggest an addition or modification to this list, please email relevant course information to

Students should also consult the directory of classes and school bulletins to identify other potential courses that may fulfill degree requirements. We try to keep this information as up-to-date as possible, but students should confirm course times and locations with the Registrar Directory of Classes or the department offering the course.

Before each semester’s registration period, students should notify the program of which human rights courses he or she plans to take in order to verify that courses of interest fulfill remaining degree requirements. Students can use the online course advising form or schedule an appointment with the program by emailing

Additional information regarding concentration and elective requirements is available on the UHRP course advising form.

Pre-approved major and concentration courses from the previous semester are also available online.

Fall 2014 Courses

Hover over a course to view its description, or switch to bulletin view to show all course descriptions.

Major – Pre-approved Core Courses

Students who major in human rights must take 32 credits. As part of the major requirements, students take one course in three of the four categories: Politics and History; Culture and Representation; Political Theory and Philosophy; and Social and Economic Processes. 

Please see the major requirements for additional information about the program.

The following courses are pre-approved for the major.

Politics and History

DeptCourse#FormatCourse TitleInstructor(s)CreditsDay / Time

AFAS C1001: Introduction to African-American Studies
Sorett, Josef; 3 credits; MW 10:10am-11:25am (LEC)

From the arrival of enslaved Africans to the recent election of President Barack Obama, black people have been central the story of the United States, and the Americas, more broadly. African Americans have been both contributors to, and victims of, this "New World" democratic experiment. To capture the complexities of this ongoing saga, this course offers an inter-disciplinary exploration of the development of African American cultural and political life in the U.S., but also in relationship to the different African diasporic outposts of the Atlantic world. The course will be organized both chronologically and thematically, moving from the "middle passage" to the present so-called "post-racial" moment-drawing on a range of classical texts, primary sources, and more recent secondary literature-to grapple with key questions, concerns and problems (i.e. agency, resistance, culture, structure, etc.) that have preoccupied scholars of African American history, culture and politics. Students will be introduced to range of disciplinary methods and theoretical approaches (spanning the humanities and social sciences), while also attending to the critical tension between intellectual work and everyday life, which are central to the formation of African-American Studies as an academic field. This course will engage specific social formations (i.e. migration, urbanization, globalization, diaspora, etc), significant cultural/political developments (i.e. uplift ideologies, nationalism, feminism, pan-Africanism, religion/spirituality, etc), and hallmark moments/movements (i.e. Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights movement, Black Power, etc). By the end of the semester students will be expected to possess a working knowledge of major themes/figures/traditions, alongside a range of cultural/political practices and institutional arrangements, in African American Studies.

AFASC1001LECIntroduction to African-American StudiesSorett, Josef3MW 10:10am-11:25am

AFAS G4080: Topics in the Black Experience: MLK and Radical Democracy
Hendricks, Obery; 4 credits; T 11:00am-12:50pm (SEM)

When Martin Luther King, Jr., proclaimed, “America, you must be born again,” he was speaking in much more than religious or even racial terms. Clearly he had in mind something long sought for but not yet achieved: a truly democratic America ruled by the demos, the people, rather than by the entrenched forces of capital. For King, a “reborn” America meant a radical reconfiguration of the priorities of market-driven capitalism, which he believed distorted the human personality and moral values; a serious consideration of key aspects of democratic socialism, which he felt was crucial for a truly just political economy; a more comprehensive economic safety net that would allow every American to live with dignity and without want; and a body politic and policy-making process based on uncompromising moral principles rather than political expediency. Using King’s writings, sermons, speeches and historical accounts of his deeds and strategies, as well as key readings in political economy, religion, and basic political theory, we will explore the implications of King’s vision for today and the kinds of policies and social actions implicit in his vision that could make today’s America more politically, socially and economically just – in other words, a more fair and democratic democracy for all Americans.

AFASG4080SEMTopics in the Black Experience: MLK and Radical DemocracyHendricks, Obery4T 11:00am-12:50pm

AFRS BC3560: Human Rights and Social Change in Sub-Saharan Africa
Martin, J. Paul; 4 credits; T 9:00am-10:50am (SEM)

Examines the evolution of the ideas, institutions and practices associated with social justice in Africa and their relationship to contemporary international human rights movement and focuses on the role of human rights in social change. A number of themes will re-occur throughout the course, notably tensions between norms and reality, cultural diversity, economic and political asymmetries, the role of external actors, and women as rights providers. Countries of special interest include Liberia, Senegal, South African and Tanzania.

AFRSBC3560SEMHuman Rights and Social Change in Sub-Saharan AfricaMartin, J. Paul4T 9:00am-10:50am

AMST W3930: Topics in American Studies: History of the US Supreme Court
Rosenberg, Benjamin; 4 credits; M 6:10pm-8:00pm (SEM)

As Tocqueville observed, “scarcely any political question arises in the United States that is not resolved, sooner or later, into a judicial question.” As a consequence, the Supreme Court of the United States has been at the center of many of the most significant developments in American history. It has played significant roles in, for example, (1) the creation of the young republic and the achievement of a balance between states and the federal government, (2) race relations including the institution of slavery, (3) the rights of workers, (4) civil rights, and (5) elections. This seminar will explore the Supreme Court’s role in American society by examining its decisions on key issues throughout its history.

AMSTW3930SEMTopics in American Studies: History of the US Supreme CourtRosenberg, Benjamin4M 6:10pm-8:00pm

AMST W3930: Topics in American Studies: Freedom & Citizenship
Montas, Roosevelt; 4 credits; T 4:10pm-6:00pm (SEM)

Freedom and Citizenship in the United States will examine the historical development of ideas of freedom and citizenship in the American context. We will examine texts that treat of issues like the rights and responsibilities of membership in a political association, the nature and limits of the power of the collective over the individual, and the norms of exclusion and inclusion that define a body politic. The course will focus exclusively on primary texts, and the order of readings will be roughly chronological, emphasizing the historical development of the concepts of citizenship, nation, and American identity. The first weeks the course will be dedicated to reading and discussing major texts in Western political history that frame the 17th century founding of the American colonies. The rest of the course will situate the American case in this historical development, beginning with an examination of the Puritan migration to New England and the early communities they formed, and continuing with the study of major documents surrounding the Revolution, the Civil War, Reconstruction, the New Deal, the Civil Rights Movement, and contemporary debates about the meaning of American citizenship. In addition to the classroom requirements, students will be expected to volunteer a minimum of 4 hours a week with the Double Discovery Center (DDC), in connection to the Freedom and Citizenship Project which DDC conducts in partnership with the American Studies Program.

AMSTW3930SEMTopics in American Studies: Freedom & Citizenship Montas, Roosevelt4T 4:10pm-6:00pm

ANTH V2010: Major Debates in the Study of Africa
Mandani, Mahmood; 3 credits; MW 11:40am-12:55pm (LEC)

This course will focus on key debates that have shaped the study of Africa in the postcolonial African academy. We will cover six key debates (a) history before external impact; (b) agency and responsibility in different kinds of slave trade; (c) State Formation (conquest, slavery, colonialism); (d) underdevelopment (colonialism and globalization); (e) nationalism and the anti-colonial struggle; (f) pan-Africanism and globalization. The approach will be multidisciplinary and readings will be illustrative of different sides in the debate.

ANTHV2010LECMajor Debates in the Study of AfricaMandani, Mahmood3MW 11:40am-12:55pm

CSER W3490: Post 9/11 Immigration Policy
OuYang, Elizabeth; 4 credits; R 11:00am-12:50pm (SEM)

Since September 11, 2001, there has been an avalanche of immigration enforcement policies and initiatives proposed or implemented under the guise of national security. This course will analyze the domino effect of the Patriot Act, the Absconder Initiative, Special Registration, the Real I.D. Act, border security including the building of the 700 mile fence along the U.S./Mexico border, Secured Communities Act-that requires the cooperation of state and local authorities in immigration enforcement, the challenge to birthright citizenship, and now the congressional hearings on Islamic radicalization. Have these policies been effective in combating the war on terrorism and promoting national security? Who stands to benefit from these enforcement strategies? Do immigrant communities feel safer in the U.S.? How have states joined the federal bandwagon of immigration enforcement or created solutions to an inflexible, broken immigration system?

CSERW3490SEMPost 9/11 Immigration PolicyOuYang, Elizabeth4R 11:00am-12:50pm

CSER W3924: Latino/a and Latin American Social Movements
Rockefeller, Stuart; 4 credits; T 11:00am-12:50pm (SEM)

In Latin America, a wave of new popular social movements has been transforming politics and social reality. In the United States, latino/a are building on decades of organizing and demographic growth to claim a new public persona and challenge their marginal status. What are the significant areas of political action, and how can we understand them? What claims can those disenfranchised for reasons of race, class or national origin make on societies? We will discuss a number of important social movements throughout the region, while developing tools for understanding social movements and their possibilities.

CSERW3924SEMLatino/a and Latin American Social MovementsRockefeller, Stuart4T 11:00am-12:50pm

CSER W3928: Colonization/Decolonization
Tuttle, Gray; 4 credits; R 4:10pm-6:00pm (SEM)

This course explores the centrality of colonialism in the making of the modern world, emphasizing cross-cultural and social contact, exchange, and relations of power; dynamics of conquest and resistance; and discourses of civilization, empire, freedom, nationalism, and human rights, from 1500 to 2000. Topics include pre-modern empires; European exploration, contact, and conquest in the new world; Atlantic-world slavery and emancipation; European and Japanese colonialism in Asia, Africa, the Middle East. The course ends with a section on decolonization and post-colonialism in the period after World War II. Intensive reading and discussion of primary documents.

CSERW3928SEMColonization/DecolonizationTuttle, Gray4R 4:10pm-6:00pm

HIST BC3440: Introduction to African-American History
Naylor, Celia; 3 credits; TR 10:10am-11:25am (LEC)

Major themes in African-American History: slave trade, slavery, resistance, segregation, the "New Negro," Civil Rights, Black Power, challenges and manifestations of the contemporary "Color Line."

HISTBC3440LECIntroduction to African-American HistoryNaylor, Celia3TR 10:10am-11:25am

HIST W4125: Censure/Freedom of Expression in Early Modern Europe
Carlebach, Elisheva; 4 credits; M 9:00am-10:50am (SEM)

In this course we will examine theoretical and historical developments that framed the notions of censorship and free expression in early modern Europe. In the last two decades, the role of censorship has become one of the significant elements in discussions of early modern culture. The history of printing and of the book, of the rise national-political cultures and their projections of control, religious wars and denominational schisms are some of the factors that intensified debate over the free circulation of ideas and speech.

HISTW4125SEMCensure/Freedom of Expression in Early Modern EuropeCarlebach, Elisheva4M 9:00am-10:50am

HRTS BC3852: Child Protection, Rights Perspective
Bissell, Susan; 4 credits; W 6:10pm-8:00pm (SEM)

Description not currently available

HRTSBC3852SEMChild Protection, Rights PerspectiveBissell, Susan4W 6:10pm-8:00pm

HRTS W3950: Human Rights and Human Wrongs
Cronin, Bruce; 4 credits; W 11:00am-12:50pm (SEM)

This course will examine the tension between two contradictory trends in world politics. On the one hand, we have emerged from a century that has seen some of the most brutal practices ever perpetrated by states against their populations in the form of genocide, systematic torture, mass murder and ethnic cleansing. Many of these abuses occurred after the Holocaust, even though the mantra “never again” was viewed by many as a pledge never to allow a repeat of these practices. Events in the new century suggest that these trends will not end anytime soon. At the same time, since the middle of the twentieth century, for the first time in human history there has been a growing global consensus that all individuals are entitled to at least some level of protection from abuse by their governments. This concept of human rights has been institutionalized through international law, diplomacy, international discourse, transnational activism, and the foreign policies of many states. Over the past two decades, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and international tribunals have gone further than any institutions in human history to try to stem state abuses. This seminar will try to make sense of these contradictions.

HRTSW3950SEMHuman Rights and Human WrongsCronin, Bruce4W 11:00am-12:50pm

HRTS G4215: International Human Rights Movements: Past, Present, Future
Bickford, Louis; 3 credits; M 4:10pm-6:00pm (SEM)

The human rights movement is one of the most successful social justice movements of our time, establishing universal principles that govern how states should treat citizens and non-citizens. The movement strengthens, and is strengthened by, a complex web of institutions, laws, and norms that constitute a functioning global system that builds on itself progressively, animated by strong NGOs. The course will address the evolution of the international human rights movement and on the NGOs that drive the movement on the international, regional and domestic levels. Sessions will highlight the experiences of major human rights NGOs and will address topics including strategy development, institutional representation, research methodologies, partnerships, networks, venues of engagement, campaigning, fundraising and, perhaps most importantly, the fraught and complex debates about adaptation to changing global circumstances. PRIORITY TO HRSMA; 4TH YEAR UNDERGRADS IF SPACE ALLOWS

HRTSG4215SEMInternational Human Rights Movements: Past, Present, FutureBickford, Louis3M 4:10pm-6:00pm

POLS W3202: Labor and American Politics
Warren, Dorian; 3 credits; TBA (LEC)

This course examines the role and impact of organized labor in American politics. It will explore the history and development of the American labor movement; its significance as a central political actor in major social policy debates of the 20th century; as a mobilizing force in elections; its complex and often uneasy relationship with other political actors including business, urban political machines, and the civil rights movement; and contemporary dilemmas facing labor in a period of union decline and resurgence.

POLSW3202LECLabor and American PoliticsWarren, Dorian3TBA

POLS V3240: Race, Law and American Politics
Kato, Daniel; 3 credits; MW 2:40pm-3:55pm (LEC)

American Politics Prerequisites: POLS V 1201 or equivalent This class focuses on the broader implications of race as it relates to constitutional law, resistance movements and political economy. This class examines the dynamic relationship between race, law and American politics as a lens by which to interrogate core concepts in legal, social and political decision-making.

POLSV3240LECRace, Law and American PoliticsKato, Daniel3MW 2:40pm-3:55pm

POLS W3285: Freedom of Speech and Press
Bollinger, Lee; 3 credits; MW 4:10pm-5:25pm (LEC)

Examines the constitutional right of freedom of speech and press in the United States. Examines, in depth, various areas of law, including extremist or seditious speech, obscenity, libel, fighting words, the public forum doctrine, and public access to the mass media. Follows the law school course model, with readings focused on actual judicial decisions.

POLSW3285LECFreedom of Speech and PressBollinger, Lee3MW 4:10pm-5:25pm

POLS BC3521: Civil Rights & Civil Liberties
Franzese, Paula; 3 credits; T 4:10pm-6:00pm (LEC)

Explores seminal caselaw to inform contemporary civil rights and civil liberties jurisprudence and policy. Specifically, the readings examine historical and contemporary first amendment values, including freedom of speech and the press, economic liberties, takings law, discrimination based on race, gender, class and sexual preference, affirmative action, the right to privacy, reproductive freedom, the right to die, criminal procedure and adjudication, the rights of the criminally accused post-9/11 and the death penalty.

POLSBC3521LECCivil Rights & Civil LibertiesFranzese, Paula3T 4:10pm-6:00pm

POLS BC3810: Aid, Pol, Violence Africa
Autesserre, Severine; 4 credits; W 2:10pm-4:00pm (COL)

International Relations Prerequisites: POLS V1601 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus. Explores the concepts, theoretical traditions and debates around development and humanitarian aid, focusing on the relationships between aid, politics, and violence. It looks at the political and military impacts of aid, the linkage between humanitarian aid and conflict resolution, and aid's contribution to perpetuating subtle forms of domination.

POLSBC3810COLAid, Pol, Violence AfricaAutesserre, Severine4W 2:10pm-4:00pm

POLS W3911: Citizenship and Exclusion
Isiksel, Turkuler; 4 credits; M 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission is required to register. Pre-registration is not permitted. Seminar in Political Theory. Pre-registration is not permitted. For most seminars, interested students must attend the first class meeting, after which the instructor will decide whom to admit. Senior majors receive priority, followed by junior majors, then all other students.

POLSW3911SEMCitizenship and ExclusionIsiksel, Turkuler4M 2:10pm-4:00pm

POLS W3911: Religion, Democracy and Human Rights
Cohen, Jean; 4 credits; W 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

This course will begin with a focus on the work of four classic thinkers in the critical analysis of religion: Rousseau, Marx, Tocqueville and Weber. We will discuss the meaning of the secularization thesis in their work, the relation of religion to modernity, and their views, when relevant, on the relation between religion and democracy. We then turn to contemporary authors involved in rethinking the secularization thesis, the place of religion in modernity as well as its relation to democracy. The works of Casanova, Assad, Rawls, Taylor and Habermas will be read.

POLSW3911SEMReligion, Democracy and Human RightsCohen, Jean4W 2:10pm-4:00pm

POLS W3921: American Politics Seminar: Equality and the Law
Abdur, Robert; 4 credits; R 4:10pm-6:00pm (SEM)

Description not currently available

POLSW3921SEMAmerican Politics Seminar: Equality and the LawAbdur, Robert4R 4:10pm-6:00pm

POLS W3921: American Politics Seminar: Bill of Rights
Zebrowski, Martha K; 4 credits; T 6:10pm-8:00pm (SEM)

This seminar is an investigation of the nature and importance of the federal Bill of Rights in the American federal and state constitutional systems. Common readings, class discussions, and student seminar papers consider the social, political, and legal significance of the Bill of Rights in historical and contemporary American discourse and analysis, along with constitutional case law regarding specific rights. The first part of the course is devoted to a discussion of common, required readings that consider the Bill of Rights in historical and contemporary perspective. The second part of the course is devoted to students' presentations, in class, of their own research on individual topics relating to a particular rights grounded in the American federal and state bills of rights.

POLSW3921SEMAmerican Politics Seminar: Bill of RightsZebrowski, Martha K4T 6:10pm-8:00pm

POLS W3922: American Politics Seminar: Issues that Divide America
Gertzog, Irwin; 4 credits; T 11:00am-12:50pm (SEM)

Seminar focuses on four political issues so contentious that they have produced enduring cultural, socio-economic, and political divisions throughout the United States. The four issues are slavery and efforts to end it; the use of alcoholic beverages and the struggle to curtail it; abortion and attempts to prohibit it; and lesbian and gay rights and the battle to impede them.

POLSW3922SEMAmerican Politics Seminar: Issues that Divide AmericaGertzog, Irwin4T 11:00am-12:50pm

POLS W3930: Constitutional Law
Rosdeitcher, Sidney; 4 credits; T 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

This course explores major features of U.S. constitutional law through close examination of  selected decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court.  Through student discussion and some lecturing, the seminar addresses issues arising from the Constitution's allocation of power among the three branches of government, including the role of the federal judiciary in a democratic polity; the allocation of powers between the National and State governments, including the scope of Congress’ regulatory powers; and the protection of the private sphere from arbitrary and discriminatory government conduct, including the evolution of the concept of liberty from its protection of economic interests before the New Deal to its current role in  protecting individual autonomy and privacy, protections against racial and gender discrimination and some aspects of freedom of speech and press.  More generally the seminar aims to enhance understanding of some main aspects of our constitutional tradition and the judicial process by which it is elaborated.

POLSW3930SEMConstitutional LawRosdeitcher, Sidney4T 2:10pm-4:00pm

POLS G4240: Great Books on Race, Politics, and Society
Harris, Fredrick; 4 credits; R 12:10pm-2:00pm (SEM)

This seminar introduces students to classic works on race, social science, and public policy. The course will explore how social scientists have defined and constructed the conditions of black communities and how those definitions and constructions have varied and influenced policy debates over time. Students are required to write an original research paper on a policy area that examines the tensions between individual and structural explanations for the persistence of racial inequality.

POLSG4240SEMGreat Books on Race, Politics, and SocietyHarris, Fredrick4R 12:10pm-2:00pm

RELI W4825: Religion, Gender and Violence
Jakobsen, Janet; 4 credits; T 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

Investigates relations among religion, gender, and violence in the world today. Focuses on specific traditions with emphasis on historical change, variation, and differences in geopolitical location within each tradition, as well as among them at given historical moments.

RELIW4825SEMReligion, Gender and ViolenceJakobsen, Janet4T 2:10pm-4:00pm

WMST W3916: Historical Approaches to Feminist Questions
Nelson, Alondra; 4 credits; M 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

Historical Approaches to Feminist Questions” examines issues of gender and sexuality across time and space. We explore how feminist analyses may reorient how we think about the past. We also ask how historical perspectives can bring the contingent and contextual nature of ideas about gender and sexuality into relief. We will consult both primary and secondary historical sources as well as key theoretical texts on the politics of women’s history and the history of sexuality in intersection with other forms of identity and inequality.

WMSTW3916SEMHistorical Approaches to Feminist QuestionsNelson, Alondra4M 2:10pm-4:00pm

Culture and Representation

DeptCourse#FormatCourse TitleInstructor(s)CreditsDay / Time

AFAS C3930: Topic in the Black Experience: Hip Hop and Social Inequality
Lewis, R. L'heureux; 4 credits; W 11:00am-12:50pm (SEM)

This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to understanding contemporary social ills through the lens of Hip-Hop culture. Issues like race, class, gender, poverty and sexuality are common concerns in the wider social world, but Hip-Hop has provided unique articulations of and responses to these issues. Hip-Hop often “gives voice” to the voiceless, at the same time, Hip-Hop has been a site for inequality. We will explore the degree to which Hip-Hop is or can be a social change agent. This course will expose students to the field of Hip-Hop Studies, issues in urban America, and international perspectives on Hip-Hop culture.

AFASC3930SEMTopic in the Black Experience: Hip Hop and Social InequalityLewis, R. L'heureux4W 11:00am-12:50pm

AFAS G4080: Topics in the Black Experience: African American Writers - Questions of Justice
Griffin, Farah; 4 credits; W 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

African American Novelists and the Question of Justice This course asks, “What conceptions of Justice emerge from a selection of works by canonical African American writers?” We open with an exploration of Justice in the works of the Greek dramatist, Aeschylus, the Hebrew Bible and the contemporary Philosopher, Michael Sandel. We then turn to texts by Charles Chesnutt, Richard Wright, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, Ernest Gaines and Toni Morrison to examine the way these writers engage, negotiate and critique the relationship between Justice and Race in the United States. Draft Text : Aeschylus, The Orestia The Bible: Ezekiel 18, Vs. 7-17; Matthew 25 Michael Sandel, Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do? Charles Chesnutt. The Marrow of Tradition Zora Neale Hurston. Moses, Man of the Mountain Richard Wright. Native Son Ralph Ellison. Invisible Man Ernest Gaines. A Lesson Before Dying Toni Morrison. Song of Solomon

AFASG4080SEMTopics in the Black Experience: African American Writers - Questions of JusticeGriffin, Farah4W 2:10pm-4:00pm

AFRS BC3110: The Africana Colloquium: Critical Race Theory
Hall, Kim; 4 credits; T 6:10pm-8:00pm (COL)

Students will examine the origins and development of race-thinking in the Anglo‑American world with a particular focus on representation and reading practices. Our conversations will draw upon a number of articulations of race theory, including specific post-1980s Critical Race Theory. The course examines "race" narratives as well as critical readings on race from psychoanalytic, post‑colonial, feminist, and critical legal perspectives. These readings will be framed by several interlocking questions: how does representation both respond to and influence socioeconomic conditions? What is the relationship of race to color, ethnicity, and nation? How does race interact with other categories such as class, sexuality and gender? What cultural work is performed by racial definitions and categories such as hybridity and purity?

AFRSBC3110COLThe Africana Colloquium: Critical Race TheoryHall, Kim4T 6:10pm-8:00pm

CLEN W4550: Narrative and Human Rights
Slaughter, Joseph R; 3 credits; MW 6:10pm-7:25pm (LEC)

We can’t talk about human rights without talking about the forms in which we talk about human rights. This course will study the convergences of the thematics, philosophies, politics, practices, and formal properties of literature and human rights. In particular, it will examine how literary questions of narrative shape (and are shaped by) human rights concerns; how do the forms of stories enable and respond to forms of thought, forms of commitment, forms of being, forms of justice, and forms of violation? How does narrative help us to imagine an international order based on human dignity, rights, and equality? We will read classic literary texts and contemporary writing (both literary and non-literary) and view a number of films and other multimedia projects to think about the relationships between story forms and human rights problematics and practices. Likely literary authors: Ishmael Beah, Roberto Bolaño, Miguel de Cervantes, Ariel Dorfman, Slavenka Drakulic, Nuruddin Farah, Janette Turner Hospital, Franz Kafka, Sahar Kalifeh, Sindiwe Magona, Michael Ondaatje, Alicia Partnoy, Marjane Satrapi, Ousmane Sembène, Mark Twain . . . . We will also read theoretical and historical pieces by authors such as Agamben, An-Na’im, Appiah, Arendt, Balibar, Bloch, Chakrabarty, Derrida, Douzinas, Habermas, Harlow, Ignatieff, Laclau and Mouffe, Levinas, Lyotard, Marx, Mutua, Nussbaum, Rorty, Said, Scarry, Soyinka, Spivak, Williams.

CLENW4550LECNarrative and Human RightsSlaughter, Joseph R3MW 6:10pm-7:25pm

CPLS W4220: Narrative, Health, and Social Justice
DasGupta, Sayantani; 4 credits; T 10:10am-12:00pm (SEM)

Description not currently available

CPLSW4220SEMNarrative, Health, and Social JusticeDasGupta, Sayantani4T 10:10am-12:00pm

Philosophy and Political Theory

DeptCourse#FormatCourse TitleInstructor(s)CreditsDay / Time

AFRS BC3110: The Africana Colloquium: Critical Race Theory
Hall, Kim; 4 credits; T 6:10pm-8:00pm (COL)

Students will examine the origins and development of race-thinking in the Anglo‑American world with a particular focus on representation and reading practices. Our conversations will draw upon a number of articulations of race theory, including specific post-1980s Critical Race Theory. The course examines "race" narratives as well as critical readings on race from psychoanalytic, post‑colonial, feminist, and critical legal perspectives. These readings will be framed by several interlocking questions: how does representation both respond to and influence socioeconomic conditions? What is the relationship of race to color, ethnicity, and nation? How does race interact with other categories such as class, sexuality and gender? What cultural work is performed by racial definitions and categories such as hybridity and purity?

AFRSBC3110COLThe Africana Colloquium: Critical Race TheoryHall, Kim4T 6:10pm-8:00pm

PHIL V2110: Philosophy and Feminism
Mercer, Christia; 3 credits; TR 1:10pm-2:25pm (LEC)

Is there an essential difference between women and men? How do questions about race conflict or overlap with those about gender? Is there a "normal" way of being "queer"? Introduction to philosophy and feminism through a critical discussion of these and other questions using historical and contemporary texts, art, and public lectures. Focus includes essentialism, difference, identity, knowledge, objectivity, and queerness.

PHILV2110LECPhilosophy and FeminismMercer, Christia3TR 1:10pm-2:25pm

PHIL V3701: Ethics
Vogt, Katja; 4 credits; TR 10:10am-11:25am (LEC)

Prerequisites: One course in philosophy Corequisites: PHILV3711 Required Discussion Section 0 points Prerequisites: One course in philosophy. Introduction to the three central theories of normative ethics: consequentialism, deontology, and virtue ethics; introduction to selected topics in meta-ethics. Required Discussion Section.

PHILV3701LECEthicsVogt, Katja4TR 10:10am-11:25am

PHIL V3752: Philosophy of Law
Moody-Adams, Michele; 3 credits; MW 2:40pm-3:55pm (SEM)

This course explores philosophical reflection on the relationship between law, society and morality. We discuss the nature of law, the nature of legal reasoning, the relationship between law and social policy, and central concepts in civil and criminal law. Readings are drawn from such sources as the natural law tradidion, legal positivism, legal realism, and Critical Legal Theory. Readings will be supplemented by analysis of classic cases.

PHILV3752SEMPhilosophy of LawMoody-Adams, Michele3MW 2:40pm-3:55pm

POLS V1013: Political Theory
Johnston, David; 3 credits; TR 10:10am-11:25am (LEC)

What is the relationship between law and justice? Are capacities of political judgment shared by the many or reserved for the few? What does human equality consist of and what are its implications? Can individual freedom be reconciled with the demands of political community? What are the origins and effects of persistent gender inequalities? These are some of the crucial questions that we will address in this introductory course in political theory. The course is divided into five thematic sections, each addressing an enduring political problem or issue and centered on a key text in the history of political thought: 1. Laws, Obligations, and the Question of Disobedience Sophocles, Antigone; 2. Democratic Citizenship and the Capacities of Political Judgment Plato, Republic; 3. Origins and Effects of (In)equality John Locke, Second Treatise of Civil Government; 4. Paradoxes of Freedom Jean Jacques Rousseau, On the Social Contract; 5. The Woman Question John Stuart Mill, The Subjection of Women.

POLSV1013LECPolitical TheoryJohnston, David3TR 10:10am-11:25am

POLS W3100: Justice
Johnston, David; 3 credits; MW 11:40am-12:55pm (LEC)

An inquiry into the nature and implications of justice, including examinations of selected cases and issues such as Roe v. Wade, the O.J. Simpson case, the Pinochet case, affirmative action, recent tobacco litigation, and the international distribution of income and wealth.

POLSW3100LECJusticeJohnston, David3MW 11:40am-12:55pm

POLS W3911: Religion, Democracy and Human Rights
Cohen, Jean; 4 credits; W 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

This course will begin with a focus on the work of four classic thinkers in the critical analysis of religion: Rousseau, Marx, Tocqueville and Weber. We will discuss the meaning of the secularization thesis in their work, the relation of religion to modernity, and their views, when relevant, on the relation between religion and democracy. We then turn to contemporary authors involved in rethinking the secularization thesis, the place of religion in modernity as well as its relation to democracy. The works of Casanova, Assad, Rawls, Taylor and Habermas will be read.

POLSW3911SEMReligion, Democracy and Human RightsCohen, Jean4W 2:10pm-4:00pm

POLS W3921: American Politics Seminar: Equality and the Law
Abdur, Robert; 4 credits; R 4:10pm-6:00pm (SEM)

Description not currently available

POLSW3921SEMAmerican Politics Seminar: Equality and the LawAbdur, Robert4R 4:10pm-6:00pm

RELI W4825: Religion, Gender and Violence
Jakobsen, Janet; 4 credits; T 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

Investigates relations among religion, gender, and violence in the world today. Focuses on specific traditions with emphasis on historical change, variation, and differences in geopolitical location within each tradition, as well as among them at given historical moments.

RELIW4825SEMReligion, Gender and ViolenceJakobsen, Janet4T 2:10pm-4:00pm

Social and Economic Processes

DeptCourse#FormatCourse TitleInstructor(s)CreditsDay / Time

CSER W3924: Latino/a and Latin American Social Movements
Rockefeller, Stuart; 4 credits; T 11:00am-12:50pm (SEM)

In Latin America, a wave of new popular social movements has been transforming politics and social reality. In the United States, latino/a are building on decades of organizing and demographic growth to claim a new public persona and challenge their marginal status. What are the significant areas of political action, and how can we understand them? What claims can those disenfranchised for reasons of race, class or national origin make on societies? We will discuss a number of important social movements throughout the region, while developing tools for understanding social movements and their possibilities.

CSERW3924SEMLatino/a and Latin American Social MovementsRockefeller, Stuart4T 11:00am-12:50pm

ECON W4480: Gender and Applied Economics
Edlund, Lena; 3 credits; TR 1:10pm-2:25pm (LEC)

This course studies gender gaps, their extent, determinants and consequences. The focus will be on the allocation of rights in different cultures and over time, why women's rights have typically been more limited and why most societies have traditionally favored males in the allocation of resources.

ECONW4480LECGender and Applied EconomicsEdlund, Lena3TR 1:10pm-2:25pm

ECON W4911: Seminar in Microeconomic Theory - Poverty, Inequality and Mobility
Musatti, Caterina; 4 credits; M 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

Selected topics in microeconomics. Selected topics will be posted on the department webpage.

ECONW4911SEMSeminar in Microeconomic Theory - Poverty, Inequality and MobilityMusatti, Caterina4M 2:10pm-4:00pm

HRTS BC3850: Human Rights and Public Health
Schleifer, Rebecca; 4 credits; M 6:10pm-8:00pm (SEM)

Description not currently available

HRTSBC3850SEMHuman Rights and Public HealthSchleifer, Rebecca4M 6:10pm-8:00pm

HRTS BC3852: Child Protection, Rights Perspective
Bissell, Susan; 4 credits; W 6:10pm-8:00pm (SEM)

Description not currently available

HRTSBC3852SEMChild Protection, Rights PerspectiveBissell, Susan4W 6:10pm-8:00pm

HRTS G4215: International Human Rights Movements: Past, Present, Future
Bickford, Louis; 3 credits; M 4:10pm-6:00pm (SEM)

The human rights movement is one of the most successful social justice movements of our time, establishing universal principles that govern how states should treat citizens and non-citizens. The movement strengthens, and is strengthened by, a complex web of institutions, laws, and norms that constitute a functioning global system that builds on itself progressively, animated by strong NGOs. The course will address the evolution of the international human rights movement and on the NGOs that drive the movement on the international, regional and domestic levels. Sessions will highlight the experiences of major human rights NGOs and will address topics including strategy development, institutional representation, research methodologies, partnerships, networks, venues of engagement, campaigning, fundraising and, perhaps most importantly, the fraught and complex debates about adaptation to changing global circumstances. PRIORITY TO HRSMA; 4TH YEAR UNDERGRADS IF SPACE ALLOWS

HRTSG4215SEMInternational Human Rights Movements: Past, Present, FutureBickford, Louis3M 4:10pm-6:00pm

HRTS G4300: Economic, Social and Cultural Rights: Policy and Practice
Rosenthal, Mila; 3 credits; M 6:10pm-8:00pm (SEM)

This course will address economic and social human rights through the lens of what is happening now in the early 21st century, in light of the enormous shifts that have taken place since the modern human rights movement first emerged in the aftermath of WWII. The course will address many of the central debates about economic and social rights and then examine how those debates apply to specific rights and topics including development, health, housing, work, food and education. Throughout, the course will examine how activists and policymakers have responded to all these changes, and ask what might lie ahead for the human rights movement in addressing economic and social rights in a multilateral, globalized world. PRIORITY to HRSMA STUDENTS. 4th year undergraduates if space allows

HRTSG4300SEMEconomic, Social and Cultural Rights: Policy and PracticeRosenthal, Mila3M 6:10pm-8:00pm

HRTS G4404: Human Rights of Women
Saxton, Martha; 3 credits; T 4:10pm-6:00pm (LEC)

This course introduces students to a range of obstacles that have arisen - and continue to arise - in the struggle to make sure that women are treated as full and legitimate bearers of human rights as well as some of the significant critiques that have emerged from this struggle. The course provides a historical overview of conflicts over women's roles in family, the economy and the body politic and addresses gains women have made as well as challenges they face in relation to economic development, military conflict, domestic inequality, health, and religious and cultural beliefs. Materials provide a range of comparative views of advances and obstacles to women's rights in Latin America, Asia, Africa, Europe and the U.S. Students will also learn about significant instruments, strategies, and movements intended to remedy the inequalities that affect women. There will be an emphasis on close, analytic reading and concise and effective writing.

HRTSG4404LECHuman Rights of WomenSaxton, Martha3T 4:10pm-6:00pm

POLS W3202: Labor and American Politics
Warren, Dorian; 3 credits; TBA (LEC)

This course examines the role and impact of organized labor in American politics. It will explore the history and development of the American labor movement; its significance as a central political actor in major social policy debates of the 20th century; as a mobilizing force in elections; its complex and often uneasy relationship with other political actors including business, urban political machines, and the civil rights movement; and contemporary dilemmas facing labor in a period of union decline and resurgence.

POLSW3202LECLabor and American PoliticsWarren, Dorian3TBA

SOCI BC3918: Gender and Inequality/Families
Moore, Mignon; 4 credits; R 10:10am-12:00pm (SEM)

Critical exploration of contemporary US families. Analyzes the ways gendered forces structure relations between and among family members. Investigates changes over time in roles and expectation for family members. Topics include social class differences, LGBT families, transnational families, parent-child relationships, domestic violence, racist/ethnic variation in men’s experiences.

SOCIBC3918SEMGender and Inequality/FamiliesMoore, Mignon4R 10:10am-12:00pm

WMST W3915: Gender and Power in Global Perspective
Bernstein, Elizabeth; 4 credits; W 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

Considers formations of gender, sexuality, and power as they circulate transnationally as well as transnational feminist movements that have emerged to address contemporary gendered inequalities. Topics include political economy, global care chains, sexuality, sex work, and trafficking, feminist politics and human rights.

WMSTW3915SEMGender and Power in Global PerspectiveBernstein, Elizabeth4W 2:10pm-4:00pm

WMST W3916: Historical Approaches to Feminist Questions
Nelson, Alondra; 4 credits; M 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

Historical Approaches to Feminist Questions” examines issues of gender and sexuality across time and space. We explore how feminist analyses may reorient how we think about the past. We also ask how historical perspectives can bring the contingent and contextual nature of ideas about gender and sexuality into relief. We will consult both primary and secondary historical sources as well as key theoretical texts on the politics of women’s history and the history of sexuality in intersection with other forms of identity and inequality.

WMSTW3916SEMHistorical Approaches to Feminist QuestionsNelson, Alondra4M 2:10pm-4:00pm

Concentration – Pre-Approved Courses

Human Rights Majors and Concentrators can use the worksheets available from the major and concentration pages to track their progress.

DeptCourse#FormatCourse TitleInstructor(s)CreditsDay / Time

AFAS C1001: Introduction to African-American Studies
Sorett, Josef; 3 credits; MW 10:10am-11:25am (LEC)

From the arrival of enslaved Africans to the recent election of President Barack Obama, black people have been central the story of the United States, and the Americas, more broadly. African Americans have been both contributors to, and victims of, this "New World" democratic experiment. To capture the complexities of this ongoing saga, this course offers an inter-disciplinary exploration of the development of African American cultural and political life in the U.S., but also in relationship to the different African diasporic outposts of the Atlantic world. The course will be organized both chronologically and thematically, moving from the "middle passage" to the present so-called "post-racial" moment-drawing on a range of classical texts, primary sources, and more recent secondary literature-to grapple with key questions, concerns and problems (i.e. agency, resistance, culture, structure, etc.) that have preoccupied scholars of African American history, culture and politics. Students will be introduced to range of disciplinary methods and theoretical approaches (spanning the humanities and social sciences), while also attending to the critical tension between intellectual work and everyday life, which are central to the formation of African-American Studies as an academic field. This course will engage specific social formations (i.e. migration, urbanization, globalization, diaspora, etc), significant cultural/political developments (i.e. uplift ideologies, nationalism, feminism, pan-Africanism, religion/spirituality, etc), and hallmark moments/movements (i.e. Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights movement, Black Power, etc). By the end of the semester students will be expected to possess a working knowledge of major themes/figures/traditions, alongside a range of cultural/political practices and institutional arrangements, in African American Studies.

AFASC1001LECIntroduction to African-American StudiesSorett, Josef3MW 10:10am-11:25am

AFAS C3930: Topic in the Black Experience: Hip Hop and Social Inequality
Lewis, R. L'heureux; 4 credits; W 11:00am-12:50pm (SEM)

This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to understanding contemporary social ills through the lens of Hip-Hop culture. Issues like race, class, gender, poverty and sexuality are common concerns in the wider social world, but Hip-Hop has provided unique articulations of and responses to these issues. Hip-Hop often “gives voice” to the voiceless, at the same time, Hip-Hop has been a site for inequality. We will explore the degree to which Hip-Hop is or can be a social change agent. This course will expose students to the field of Hip-Hop Studies, issues in urban America, and international perspectives on Hip-Hop culture.

AFASC3930SEMTopic in the Black Experience: Hip Hop and Social InequalityLewis, R. L'heureux4W 11:00am-12:50pm

AFAS G4080: Topics in the Black Experience: African American Writers - Questions of Justice
Griffin, Farah; 4 credits; W 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

African American Novelists and the Question of Justice This course asks, “What conceptions of Justice emerge from a selection of works by canonical African American writers?” We open with an exploration of Justice in the works of the Greek dramatist, Aeschylus, the Hebrew Bible and the contemporary Philosopher, Michael Sandel. We then turn to texts by Charles Chesnutt, Richard Wright, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, Ernest Gaines and Toni Morrison to examine the way these writers engage, negotiate and critique the relationship between Justice and Race in the United States. Draft Text : Aeschylus, The Orestia The Bible: Ezekiel 18, Vs. 7-17; Matthew 25 Michael Sandel, Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do? Charles Chesnutt. The Marrow of Tradition Zora Neale Hurston. Moses, Man of the Mountain Richard Wright. Native Son Ralph Ellison. Invisible Man Ernest Gaines. A Lesson Before Dying Toni Morrison. Song of Solomon

AFASG4080SEMTopics in the Black Experience: African American Writers - Questions of JusticeGriffin, Farah4W 2:10pm-4:00pm

AFAS G4080: Topics in the Black Experience: MLK and Radical Democracy
Hendricks, Obery; 4 credits; T 11:00am-12:50pm (SEM)

When Martin Luther King, Jr., proclaimed, “America, you must be born again,” he was speaking in much more than religious or even racial terms. Clearly he had in mind something long sought for but not yet achieved: a truly democratic America ruled by the demos, the people, rather than by the entrenched forces of capital. For King, a “reborn” America meant a radical reconfiguration of the priorities of market-driven capitalism, which he believed distorted the human personality and moral values; a serious consideration of key aspects of democratic socialism, which he felt was crucial for a truly just political economy; a more comprehensive economic safety net that would allow every American to live with dignity and without want; and a body politic and policy-making process based on uncompromising moral principles rather than political expediency. Using King’s writings, sermons, speeches and historical accounts of his deeds and strategies, as well as key readings in political economy, religion, and basic political theory, we will explore the implications of King’s vision for today and the kinds of policies and social actions implicit in his vision that could make today’s America more politically, socially and economically just – in other words, a more fair and democratic democracy for all Americans.

AFASG4080SEMTopics in the Black Experience: MLK and Radical DemocracyHendricks, Obery4T 11:00am-12:50pm

AFRS BC3110: The Africana Colloquium: Critical Race Theory
Hall, Kim; 4 credits; T 6:10pm-8:00pm (COL)

Students will examine the origins and development of race-thinking in the Anglo‑American world with a particular focus on representation and reading practices. Our conversations will draw upon a number of articulations of race theory, including specific post-1980s Critical Race Theory. The course examines "race" narratives as well as critical readings on race from psychoanalytic, post‑colonial, feminist, and critical legal perspectives. These readings will be framed by several interlocking questions: how does representation both respond to and influence socioeconomic conditions? What is the relationship of race to color, ethnicity, and nation? How does race interact with other categories such as class, sexuality and gender? What cultural work is performed by racial definitions and categories such as hybridity and purity?

AFRSBC3110COLThe Africana Colloquium: Critical Race TheoryHall, Kim4T 6:10pm-8:00pm

AFRS BC3560: Human Rights and Social Change in Sub-Saharan Africa
Martin, J. Paul; 4 credits; T 9:00am-10:50am (SEM)

Examines the evolution of the ideas, institutions and practices associated with social justice in Africa and their relationship to contemporary international human rights movement and focuses on the role of human rights in social change. A number of themes will re-occur throughout the course, notably tensions between norms and reality, cultural diversity, economic and political asymmetries, the role of external actors, and women as rights providers. Countries of special interest include Liberia, Senegal, South African and Tanzania.

AFRSBC3560SEMHuman Rights and Social Change in Sub-Saharan AfricaMartin, J. Paul4T 9:00am-10:50am

AMST W3930: Topics in American Studies: History of the US Supreme Court
Rosenberg, Benjamin; 4 credits; M 6:10pm-8:00pm (SEM)

As Tocqueville observed, “scarcely any political question arises in the United States that is not resolved, sooner or later, into a judicial question.” As a consequence, the Supreme Court of the United States has been at the center of many of the most significant developments in American history. It has played significant roles in, for example, (1) the creation of the young republic and the achievement of a balance between states and the federal government, (2) race relations including the institution of slavery, (3) the rights of workers, (4) civil rights, and (5) elections. This seminar will explore the Supreme Court’s role in American society by examining its decisions on key issues throughout its history.

AMSTW3930SEMTopics in American Studies: History of the US Supreme CourtRosenberg, Benjamin4M 6:10pm-8:00pm

AMST W3930: Topics in American Studies: Freedom & Citizenship
Montas, Roosevelt; 4 credits; T 4:10pm-6:00pm (SEM)

Freedom and Citizenship in the United States will examine the historical development of ideas of freedom and citizenship in the American context. We will examine texts that treat of issues like the rights and responsibilities of membership in a political association, the nature and limits of the power of the collective over the individual, and the norms of exclusion and inclusion that define a body politic. The course will focus exclusively on primary texts, and the order of readings will be roughly chronological, emphasizing the historical development of the concepts of citizenship, nation, and American identity. The first weeks the course will be dedicated to reading and discussing major texts in Western political history that frame the 17th century founding of the American colonies. The rest of the course will situate the American case in this historical development, beginning with an examination of the Puritan migration to New England and the early communities they formed, and continuing with the study of major documents surrounding the Revolution, the Civil War, Reconstruction, the New Deal, the Civil Rights Movement, and contemporary debates about the meaning of American citizenship. In addition to the classroom requirements, students will be expected to volunteer a minimum of 4 hours a week with the Double Discovery Center (DDC), in connection to the Freedom and Citizenship Project which DDC conducts in partnership with the American Studies Program.

AMSTW3930SEMTopics in American Studies: Freedom & Citizenship Montas, Roosevelt4T 4:10pm-6:00pm

ANTH V2010: Major Debates in the Study of Africa
Mandani, Mahmood; 3 credits; MW 11:40am-12:55pm (LEC)

This course will focus on key debates that have shaped the study of Africa in the postcolonial African academy. We will cover six key debates (a) history before external impact; (b) agency and responsibility in different kinds of slave trade; (c) State Formation (conquest, slavery, colonialism); (d) underdevelopment (colonialism and globalization); (e) nationalism and the anti-colonial struggle; (f) pan-Africanism and globalization. The approach will be multidisciplinary and readings will be illustrative of different sides in the debate.

ANTHV2010LECMajor Debates in the Study of AfricaMandani, Mahmood3MW 11:40am-12:55pm

CLEN W4550: Narrative and Human Rights
Slaughter, Joseph R; 3 credits; MW 6:10pm-7:25pm (LEC)

We can’t talk about human rights without talking about the forms in which we talk about human rights. This course will study the convergences of the thematics, philosophies, politics, practices, and formal properties of literature and human rights. In particular, it will examine how literary questions of narrative shape (and are shaped by) human rights concerns; how do the forms of stories enable and respond to forms of thought, forms of commitment, forms of being, forms of justice, and forms of violation? How does narrative help us to imagine an international order based on human dignity, rights, and equality? We will read classic literary texts and contemporary writing (both literary and non-literary) and view a number of films and other multimedia projects to think about the relationships between story forms and human rights problematics and practices. Likely literary authors: Ishmael Beah, Roberto Bolaño, Miguel de Cervantes, Ariel Dorfman, Slavenka Drakulic, Nuruddin Farah, Janette Turner Hospital, Franz Kafka, Sahar Kalifeh, Sindiwe Magona, Michael Ondaatje, Alicia Partnoy, Marjane Satrapi, Ousmane Sembène, Mark Twain . . . . We will also read theoretical and historical pieces by authors such as Agamben, An-Na’im, Appiah, Arendt, Balibar, Bloch, Chakrabarty, Derrida, Douzinas, Habermas, Harlow, Ignatieff, Laclau and Mouffe, Levinas, Lyotard, Marx, Mutua, Nussbaum, Rorty, Said, Scarry, Soyinka, Spivak, Williams.

CLENW4550LECNarrative and Human RightsSlaughter, Joseph R3MW 6:10pm-7:25pm

CPLS W4220: Narrative, Health, and Social Justice
DasGupta, Sayantani; 4 credits; T 10:10am-12:00pm (SEM)

Description not currently available

CPLSW4220SEMNarrative, Health, and Social JusticeDasGupta, Sayantani4T 10:10am-12:00pm

CSER W3490: Post 9/11 Immigration Policy
OuYang, Elizabeth; 4 credits; R 11:00am-12:50pm (SEM)

Since September 11, 2001, there has been an avalanche of immigration enforcement policies and initiatives proposed or implemented under the guise of national security. This course will analyze the domino effect of the Patriot Act, the Absconder Initiative, Special Registration, the Real I.D. Act, border security including the building of the 700 mile fence along the U.S./Mexico border, Secured Communities Act-that requires the cooperation of state and local authorities in immigration enforcement, the challenge to birthright citizenship, and now the congressional hearings on Islamic radicalization. Have these policies been effective in combating the war on terrorism and promoting national security? Who stands to benefit from these enforcement strategies? Do immigrant communities feel safer in the U.S.? How have states joined the federal bandwagon of immigration enforcement or created solutions to an inflexible, broken immigration system?

CSERW3490SEMPost 9/11 Immigration PolicyOuYang, Elizabeth4R 11:00am-12:50pm

CSER W3924: Latino/a and Latin American Social Movements
Rockefeller, Stuart; 4 credits; T 11:00am-12:50pm (SEM)

In Latin America, a wave of new popular social movements has been transforming politics and social reality. In the United States, latino/a are building on decades of organizing and demographic growth to claim a new public persona and challenge their marginal status. What are the significant areas of political action, and how can we understand them? What claims can those disenfranchised for reasons of race, class or national origin make on societies? We will discuss a number of important social movements throughout the region, while developing tools for understanding social movements and their possibilities.

CSERW3924SEMLatino/a and Latin American Social MovementsRockefeller, Stuart4T 11:00am-12:50pm

CSER W3928: Colonization/Decolonization
Tuttle, Gray; 4 credits; R 4:10pm-6:00pm (SEM)

This course explores the centrality of colonialism in the making of the modern world, emphasizing cross-cultural and social contact, exchange, and relations of power; dynamics of conquest and resistance; and discourses of civilization, empire, freedom, nationalism, and human rights, from 1500 to 2000. Topics include pre-modern empires; European exploration, contact, and conquest in the new world; Atlantic-world slavery and emancipation; European and Japanese colonialism in Asia, Africa, the Middle East. The course ends with a section on decolonization and post-colonialism in the period after World War II. Intensive reading and discussion of primary documents.

CSERW3928SEMColonization/DecolonizationTuttle, Gray4R 4:10pm-6:00pm

ECON W4480: Gender and Applied Economics
Edlund, Lena; 3 credits; TR 1:10pm-2:25pm (LEC)

This course studies gender gaps, their extent, determinants and consequences. The focus will be on the allocation of rights in different cultures and over time, why women's rights have typically been more limited and why most societies have traditionally favored males in the allocation of resources.

ECONW4480LECGender and Applied EconomicsEdlund, Lena3TR 1:10pm-2:25pm

ECON W4911: Seminar in Microeconomic Theory - Poverty, Inequality and Mobility
Musatti, Caterina; 4 credits; M 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

Selected topics in microeconomics. Selected topics will be posted on the department webpage.

ECONW4911SEMSeminar in Microeconomic Theory - Poverty, Inequality and MobilityMusatti, Caterina4M 2:10pm-4:00pm

HIST BC3440: Introduction to African-American History
Naylor, Celia; 3 credits; TR 10:10am-11:25am (LEC)

Major themes in African-American History: slave trade, slavery, resistance, segregation, the "New Negro," Civil Rights, Black Power, challenges and manifestations of the contemporary "Color Line."

HISTBC3440LECIntroduction to African-American HistoryNaylor, Celia3TR 10:10am-11:25am

HIST W4125: Censure/Freedom of Expression in Early Modern Europe
Carlebach, Elisheva; 4 credits; M 9:00am-10:50am (SEM)

In this course we will examine theoretical and historical developments that framed the notions of censorship and free expression in early modern Europe. In the last two decades, the role of censorship has become one of the significant elements in discussions of early modern culture. The history of printing and of the book, of the rise national-political cultures and their projections of control, religious wars and denominational schisms are some of the factors that intensified debate over the free circulation of ideas and speech.

HISTW4125SEMCensure/Freedom of Expression in Early Modern EuropeCarlebach, Elisheva4M 9:00am-10:50am

HRTS V3001: Introduction to Human Rights
Nathan, Andrew; 3 credits; MW 11:40am-12:55pm (LEC)

Evolution of the theory and content of human rights; the ideology and impact of human rights movements; national and international human rights law and institutions; their application with attention to universality within states, including the U.S., and internationally.

HRTSV3001LECIntroduction to Human RightsNathan, Andrew3MW 11:40am-12:55pm

HRTS BC3850: Human Rights and Public Health
Schleifer, Rebecca; 4 credits; M 6:10pm-8:00pm (SEM)

Description not currently available

HRTSBC3850SEMHuman Rights and Public HealthSchleifer, Rebecca4M 6:10pm-8:00pm

HRTS BC3852: Child Protection, Rights Perspective
Bissell, Susan; 4 credits; W 6:10pm-8:00pm (SEM)

Description not currently available

HRTSBC3852SEMChild Protection, Rights PerspectiveBissell, Susan4W 6:10pm-8:00pm

HRTS W3950: Human Rights and Human Wrongs
Cronin, Bruce; 4 credits; W 11:00am-12:50pm (SEM)

This course will examine the tension between two contradictory trends in world politics. On the one hand, we have emerged from a century that has seen some of the most brutal practices ever perpetrated by states against their populations in the form of genocide, systematic torture, mass murder and ethnic cleansing. Many of these abuses occurred after the Holocaust, even though the mantra “never again” was viewed by many as a pledge never to allow a repeat of these practices. Events in the new century suggest that these trends will not end anytime soon. At the same time, since the middle of the twentieth century, for the first time in human history there has been a growing global consensus that all individuals are entitled to at least some level of protection from abuse by their governments. This concept of human rights has been institutionalized through international law, diplomacy, international discourse, transnational activism, and the foreign policies of many states. Over the past two decades, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and international tribunals have gone further than any institutions in human history to try to stem state abuses. This seminar will try to make sense of these contradictions.

HRTSW3950SEMHuman Rights and Human WrongsCronin, Bruce4W 11:00am-12:50pm

HRTS W3995: Human Rights Senior Seminar 
; 4 credits; W 9:10am-10:50am (SEM)

Offered fall only. The senior seminar is a capstone course required for the human rights major. The seminar provides students the opportunity to discuss human rights from a variety of disciplinary perspectives and to explore various theoretical approaches and research methodologies. Students undertake individual research projects while collectively examining human rights through directed readings and discussion.

HRTSW3995SEMHuman Rights Senior Seminar 4W 9:10am-10:50am

HRTS G4215: International Human Rights Movements: Past, Present, Future
Bickford, Louis; 3 credits; M 4:10pm-6:00pm (SEM)

The human rights movement is one of the most successful social justice movements of our time, establishing universal principles that govern how states should treat citizens and non-citizens. The movement strengthens, and is strengthened by, a complex web of institutions, laws, and norms that constitute a functioning global system that builds on itself progressively, animated by strong NGOs. The course will address the evolution of the international human rights movement and on the NGOs that drive the movement on the international, regional and domestic levels. Sessions will highlight the experiences of major human rights NGOs and will address topics including strategy development, institutional representation, research methodologies, partnerships, networks, venues of engagement, campaigning, fundraising and, perhaps most importantly, the fraught and complex debates about adaptation to changing global circumstances. PRIORITY TO HRSMA; 4TH YEAR UNDERGRADS IF SPACE ALLOWS

HRTSG4215SEMInternational Human Rights Movements: Past, Present, FutureBickford, Louis3M 4:10pm-6:00pm

HRTS G4300: Economic, Social and Cultural Rights: Policy and Practice
Rosenthal, Mila; 3 credits; M 6:10pm-8:00pm (SEM)

This course will address economic and social human rights through the lens of what is happening now in the early 21st century, in light of the enormous shifts that have taken place since the modern human rights movement first emerged in the aftermath of WWII. The course will address many of the central debates about economic and social rights and then examine how those debates apply to specific rights and topics including development, health, housing, work, food and education. Throughout, the course will examine how activists and policymakers have responded to all these changes, and ask what might lie ahead for the human rights movement in addressing economic and social rights in a multilateral, globalized world. PRIORITY to HRSMA STUDENTS. 4th year undergraduates if space allows

HRTSG4300SEMEconomic, Social and Cultural Rights: Policy and PracticeRosenthal, Mila3M 6:10pm-8:00pm

HRTS G4404: Human Rights of Women
Saxton, Martha; 3 credits; T 4:10pm-6:00pm (LEC)

This course introduces students to a range of obstacles that have arisen - and continue to arise - in the struggle to make sure that women are treated as full and legitimate bearers of human rights as well as some of the significant critiques that have emerged from this struggle. The course provides a historical overview of conflicts over women's roles in family, the economy and the body politic and addresses gains women have made as well as challenges they face in relation to economic development, military conflict, domestic inequality, health, and religious and cultural beliefs. Materials provide a range of comparative views of advances and obstacles to women's rights in Latin America, Asia, Africa, Europe and the U.S. Students will also learn about significant instruments, strategies, and movements intended to remedy the inequalities that affect women. There will be an emphasis on close, analytic reading and concise and effective writing.

HRTSG4404LECHuman Rights of WomenSaxton, Martha3T 4:10pm-6:00pm

PHIL V2110: Philosophy and Feminism
Mercer, Christia; 3 credits; TR 1:10pm-2:25pm (LEC)

Is there an essential difference between women and men? How do questions about race conflict or overlap with those about gender? Is there a "normal" way of being "queer"? Introduction to philosophy and feminism through a critical discussion of these and other questions using historical and contemporary texts, art, and public lectures. Focus includes essentialism, difference, identity, knowledge, objectivity, and queerness.

PHILV2110LECPhilosophy and FeminismMercer, Christia3TR 1:10pm-2:25pm

PHIL V3701: Ethics
Vogt, Katja; 4 credits; TR 10:10am-11:25am (LEC)

Prerequisites: One course in philosophy Corequisites: PHILV3711 Required Discussion Section 0 points Prerequisites: One course in philosophy. Introduction to the three central theories of normative ethics: consequentialism, deontology, and virtue ethics; introduction to selected topics in meta-ethics. Required Discussion Section.

PHILV3701LECEthicsVogt, Katja4TR 10:10am-11:25am

PHIL V3752: Philosophy of Law
Moody-Adams, Michele; 3 credits; MW 2:40pm-3:55pm (SEM)

This course explores philosophical reflection on the relationship between law, society and morality. We discuss the nature of law, the nature of legal reasoning, the relationship between law and social policy, and central concepts in civil and criminal law. Readings are drawn from such sources as the natural law tradidion, legal positivism, legal realism, and Critical Legal Theory. Readings will be supplemented by analysis of classic cases.

PHILV3752SEMPhilosophy of LawMoody-Adams, Michele3MW 2:40pm-3:55pm

POLS V1013: Political Theory
Johnston, David; 3 credits; TR 10:10am-11:25am (LEC)

What is the relationship between law and justice? Are capacities of political judgment shared by the many or reserved for the few? What does human equality consist of and what are its implications? Can individual freedom be reconciled with the demands of political community? What are the origins and effects of persistent gender inequalities? These are some of the crucial questions that we will address in this introductory course in political theory. The course is divided into five thematic sections, each addressing an enduring political problem or issue and centered on a key text in the history of political thought: 1. Laws, Obligations, and the Question of Disobedience Sophocles, Antigone; 2. Democratic Citizenship and the Capacities of Political Judgment Plato, Republic; 3. Origins and Effects of (In)equality John Locke, Second Treatise of Civil Government; 4. Paradoxes of Freedom Jean Jacques Rousseau, On the Social Contract; 5. The Woman Question John Stuart Mill, The Subjection of Women.

POLSV1013LECPolitical TheoryJohnston, David3TR 10:10am-11:25am

POLS W3100: Justice
Johnston, David; 3 credits; MW 11:40am-12:55pm (LEC)

An inquiry into the nature and implications of justice, including examinations of selected cases and issues such as Roe v. Wade, the O.J. Simpson case, the Pinochet case, affirmative action, recent tobacco litigation, and the international distribution of income and wealth.

POLSW3100LECJusticeJohnston, David3MW 11:40am-12:55pm

POLS W3202: Labor and American Politics
Warren, Dorian; 3 credits; TBA (LEC)

This course examines the role and impact of organized labor in American politics. It will explore the history and development of the American labor movement; its significance as a central political actor in major social policy debates of the 20th century; as a mobilizing force in elections; its complex and often uneasy relationship with other political actors including business, urban political machines, and the civil rights movement; and contemporary dilemmas facing labor in a period of union decline and resurgence.

POLSW3202LECLabor and American PoliticsWarren, Dorian3TBA

POLS V3240: Race, Law and American Politics
Kato, Daniel; 3 credits; MW 2:40pm-3:55pm (LEC)

American Politics Prerequisites: POLS V 1201 or equivalent This class focuses on the broader implications of race as it relates to constitutional law, resistance movements and political economy. This class examines the dynamic relationship between race, law and American politics as a lens by which to interrogate core concepts in legal, social and political decision-making.

POLSV3240LECRace, Law and American PoliticsKato, Daniel3MW 2:40pm-3:55pm

POLS W3285: Freedom of Speech and Press
Bollinger, Lee; 3 credits; MW 4:10pm-5:25pm (LEC)

Examines the constitutional right of freedom of speech and press in the United States. Examines, in depth, various areas of law, including extremist or seditious speech, obscenity, libel, fighting words, the public forum doctrine, and public access to the mass media. Follows the law school course model, with readings focused on actual judicial decisions.

POLSW3285LECFreedom of Speech and PressBollinger, Lee3MW 4:10pm-5:25pm

POLS BC3521: Civil Rights & Civil Liberties
Franzese, Paula; 3 credits; T 4:10pm-6:00pm (LEC)

Explores seminal caselaw to inform contemporary civil rights and civil liberties jurisprudence and policy. Specifically, the readings examine historical and contemporary first amendment values, including freedom of speech and the press, economic liberties, takings law, discrimination based on race, gender, class and sexual preference, affirmative action, the right to privacy, reproductive freedom, the right to die, criminal procedure and adjudication, the rights of the criminally accused post-9/11 and the death penalty.

POLSBC3521LECCivil Rights & Civil LibertiesFranzese, Paula3T 4:10pm-6:00pm

POLS BC3810: Aid, Pol, Violence Africa
Autesserre, Severine; 4 credits; W 2:10pm-4:00pm (COL)

International Relations Prerequisites: POLS V1601 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus. Explores the concepts, theoretical traditions and debates around development and humanitarian aid, focusing on the relationships between aid, politics, and violence. It looks at the political and military impacts of aid, the linkage between humanitarian aid and conflict resolution, and aid's contribution to perpetuating subtle forms of domination.

POLSBC3810COLAid, Pol, Violence AfricaAutesserre, Severine4W 2:10pm-4:00pm

POLS W3911: Citizenship and Exclusion
Isiksel, Turkuler; 4 credits; M 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission is required to register. Pre-registration is not permitted. Seminar in Political Theory. Pre-registration is not permitted. For most seminars, interested students must attend the first class meeting, after which the instructor will decide whom to admit. Senior majors receive priority, followed by junior majors, then all other students.

POLSW3911SEMCitizenship and ExclusionIsiksel, Turkuler4M 2:10pm-4:00pm

POLS W3911: Religion, Democracy and Human Rights
Cohen, Jean; 4 credits; W 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

This course will begin with a focus on the work of four classic thinkers in the critical analysis of religion: Rousseau, Marx, Tocqueville and Weber. We will discuss the meaning of the secularization thesis in their work, the relation of religion to modernity, and their views, when relevant, on the relation between religion and democracy. We then turn to contemporary authors involved in rethinking the secularization thesis, the place of religion in modernity as well as its relation to democracy. The works of Casanova, Assad, Rawls, Taylor and Habermas will be read.

POLSW3911SEMReligion, Democracy and Human RightsCohen, Jean4W 2:10pm-4:00pm

POLS W3921: American Politics Seminar: Bill of Rights
Zebrowski, Martha K; 4 credits; T 6:10pm-8:00pm (SEM)

This seminar is an investigation of the nature and importance of the federal Bill of Rights in the American federal and state constitutional systems. Common readings, class discussions, and student seminar papers consider the social, political, and legal significance of the Bill of Rights in historical and contemporary American discourse and analysis, along with constitutional case law regarding specific rights. The first part of the course is devoted to a discussion of common, required readings that consider the Bill of Rights in historical and contemporary perspective. The second part of the course is devoted to students' presentations, in class, of their own research on individual topics relating to a particular rights grounded in the American federal and state bills of rights.

POLSW3921SEMAmerican Politics Seminar: Bill of RightsZebrowski, Martha K4T 6:10pm-8:00pm

POLS W3921: American Politics Seminar: Equality and the Law
Abdur, Robert; 4 credits; R 4:10pm-6:00pm (SEM)

Description not currently available

POLSW3921SEMAmerican Politics Seminar: Equality and the LawAbdur, Robert4R 4:10pm-6:00pm

POLS W3922: American Politics Seminar: Issues that Divide America
Gertzog, Irwin; 4 credits; T 11:00am-12:50pm (SEM)

Seminar focuses on four political issues so contentious that they have produced enduring cultural, socio-economic, and political divisions throughout the United States. The four issues are slavery and efforts to end it; the use of alcoholic beverages and the struggle to curtail it; abortion and attempts to prohibit it; and lesbian and gay rights and the battle to impede them.

POLSW3922SEMAmerican Politics Seminar: Issues that Divide AmericaGertzog, Irwin4T 11:00am-12:50pm

POLS W3930: Constitutional Law
Rosdeitcher, Sidney; 4 credits; T 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

This course explores major features of U.S. constitutional law through close examination of  selected decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court.  Through student discussion and some lecturing, the seminar addresses issues arising from the Constitution's allocation of power among the three branches of government, including the role of the federal judiciary in a democratic polity; the allocation of powers between the National and State governments, including the scope of Congress’ regulatory powers; and the protection of the private sphere from arbitrary and discriminatory government conduct, including the evolution of the concept of liberty from its protection of economic interests before the New Deal to its current role in  protecting individual autonomy and privacy, protections against racial and gender discrimination and some aspects of freedom of speech and press.  More generally the seminar aims to enhance understanding of some main aspects of our constitutional tradition and the judicial process by which it is elaborated.

POLSW3930SEMConstitutional LawRosdeitcher, Sidney4T 2:10pm-4:00pm

POLS G4240: Great Books on Race, Politics, and Society
Harris, Fredrick; 4 credits; R 12:10pm-2:00pm (SEM)

This seminar introduces students to classic works on race, social science, and public policy. The course will explore how social scientists have defined and constructed the conditions of black communities and how those definitions and constructions have varied and influenced policy debates over time. Students are required to write an original research paper on a policy area that examines the tensions between individual and structural explanations for the persistence of racial inequality.

POLSG4240SEMGreat Books on Race, Politics, and SocietyHarris, Fredrick4R 12:10pm-2:00pm

RELI W4825: Religion, Gender and Violence
Jakobsen, Janet; 4 credits; T 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

Investigates relations among religion, gender, and violence in the world today. Focuses on specific traditions with emphasis on historical change, variation, and differences in geopolitical location within each tradition, as well as among them at given historical moments.

RELIW4825SEMReligion, Gender and ViolenceJakobsen, Janet4T 2:10pm-4:00pm

SOCI BC3918: Gender and Inequality/Families
Moore, Mignon; 4 credits; R 10:10am-12:00pm (SEM)

Critical exploration of contemporary US families. Analyzes the ways gendered forces structure relations between and among family members. Investigates changes over time in roles and expectation for family members. Topics include social class differences, LGBT families, transnational families, parent-child relationships, domestic violence, racist/ethnic variation in men’s experiences.

SOCIBC3918SEMGender and Inequality/FamiliesMoore, Mignon4R 10:10am-12:00pm

WMST W3915: Gender and Power in Global Perspective
Bernstein, Elizabeth; 4 credits; W 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

Considers formations of gender, sexuality, and power as they circulate transnationally as well as transnational feminist movements that have emerged to address contemporary gendered inequalities. Topics include political economy, global care chains, sexuality, sex work, and trafficking, feminist politics and human rights.

WMSTW3915SEMGender and Power in Global PerspectiveBernstein, Elizabeth4W 2:10pm-4:00pm

WMST W3916: Historical Approaches to Feminist Questions
Nelson, Alondra; 4 credits; M 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

Historical Approaches to Feminist Questions” examines issues of gender and sexuality across time and space. We explore how feminist analyses may reorient how we think about the past. We also ask how historical perspectives can bring the contingent and contextual nature of ideas about gender and sexuality into relief. We will consult both primary and secondary historical sources as well as key theoretical texts on the politics of women’s history and the history of sexuality in intersection with other forms of identity and inequality.

WMSTW3916SEMHistorical Approaches to Feminist QuestionsNelson, Alondra4M 2:10pm-4:00pm

Additional Courses of Potential Interest

The following courses are additional courses of potential interest to human rights majors and concentrators. Students who would like to count one of these courses towards the concentration or major should consult with the program.

DeptCourse#FormatCourse TitleInstructor(s)CreditsDay / Time

AFAS W4031: Popular Music and Protest Movements
Fellezs, Kevin; 3 credits; T 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

This course will examine the relationship between popular music and popular movements. We will be taking a historical as well as a thematic approach to our inverstigation as a way to trace various legacies within popular music that fall under the rubric of "protest music" as well as to think about the ways in which popular music has assisted various communities to speak truth to power. We will also consider the ways in which the impact of the music industry has either lessened or enhanced popular music's ability to articulate "protest" or "resistance" to hegemonic power.

AFASW4031SEMPopular Music and Protest MovementsFellezs, Kevin3T 2:10pm-4:00pm

AFRS BC2004: Introduction to African Studies
Obosede, George; 3 credits; MW 11:40am-12:55pm (LEC)

Interdisciplinary and thematic approach to the study of Africa, moving from pre-colonial through colonial and post-colonial periods to contemporary Africa. Focus will be on its history, societal relations, politics and the arts. The objective is to provide a critical survey of the history as well as the continuing debates in Africana studies.

AFRSBC2004LECIntroduction to African StudiesObosede, George3MW 11:40am-12:55pm

AFRS BC3528: Harlem on My Mind: The Political Economy of Harlem
Murch, Donna; 4 credits; M 4:10pm-6:00pm (SEm)

Drawing on social histories, primary sources, fiction, and popular culture this course will explore the postwar history of Harlem. We will place Harlem in the broader context of New York City and explore how domestic and transnational migration patterns have shaped its history. Specific topics include: urbanization, migration and settlement patterns; racial liberalism and political incorporation; critical engagement with East Harlem as research cite for "culture of poverty" theorists; state criminalization of youth; underground, illegal and illicit economy from the 1960s to the 1990s; struggles over property and gentrification; and perhaps most importantly, exploring Harlem as cultural and political center of the Black World throughout the twentieth century.

AFRSBC3528SEmHarlem on My Mind: The Political Economy of HarlemMurch, Donna4M 4:10pm-6:00pm

AMST W3930: Topics in American Studies: Journalism, Democracy and the Digital Revolution
Miller, Caroline; 4 credits; W 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

The American news media occupy a complex role in the life of the nation: at once a constitutionally protected feature of democracy and a product of free enterprise. With an eye to the 2012 presidential election, this class will explore the transformation of the media from the heyday of the great 20th century news organizations to the triumph of Twitter. How have the disruption of the mainstream media and the rise of radically decentralized sources of information affected the political discourse and the decisions Americans make? We’ll look back at the Grey Lady, Walter Cronkite and Watergate, and into the future, where favored news purveyors are raw rather than mediated, hot rather than cool, personal rather than formal, targeted rather than broad, passionate rather than neutral. We’ll have visits from media players and prognosticators, examine where journalistic standards are going, and assess the impact of news sources from Fox News to the latest hashtag. Attend first class for instructor permission.

AMSTW3930SEMTopics in American Studies: Journalism, Democracy and the Digital RevolutionMiller, Caroline4W 2:10pm-4:00pm

AMST W3930: Topics in American Studies: Equity in Higher Education
Lehecka And Delbanco; 4 credits; M 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

Interview required. In this seminar we examine the roles colleges and universities play in American society; the differential access high school students have to college based on family background and income, ethnicity, and other characteristics; the causes and consequences of this differential access; and some attempts to make access more equitable. Readings and class meetings cover the following subjects historically and in the 21st century: the variety of American institutions of higher education; admission and financial aid policies at selective and less selective, private and public, colleges; affirmative action and race-conscious admissions; what "merit" means in college admissions; and the role of the high school in helping students attend college. Students in the seminar are required to spend at least four hours each week as volunteers at the Double Discovery Center (DDC) in addition to completing assigned reading, participating in seminar discussions, and completing written assignments. DDC is an on-campus program that helps New York City high school students who lack many of the resources needed to succeed in college and to be successful in gaining admission and finding financial aid. The seminar integrates students' first-hand experiences with readings and class discussions.

AMSTW3930SEMTopics in American Studies: Equity in Higher EducationLehecka And Delbanco4M 2:10pm-4:00pm

ANTH G4134: Law, History and Anthropology
Messick, Brinkley; 3 credits; F 10:00am-12:00pm (SEM)

Description not current available.

ANTH G4134SEMLaw, History and AnthropologyMessick, Brinkley3F 10:00am-12:00pm

ANTH V3821: Native America
Simpson, Audra; 4 credits; F 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

This is an undergraduate seminar that takes up primary and secondary sources and reflections to a) provide students with an historical overview of Native American issues and representational practices b) provide students with an understanding of the ways in which land expropriation and concomitant military and legal struggle have formed the core of Native-State relations and are themselves central to American and Native American history and culture c) provide students with an understanding of Native representational practices, political subjectivity and aspiration.

ANTHV3821SEMNative AmericaSimpson, Audra4F 2:10pm-4:00pm

ANTH V3873: Language and Politics
Scott, Stephen; 4 credits; M 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

Language is central to political process. While all agree that language is used to symbolize or express political action, the main focus of this course is on how language and other communicative practices contribute to the creation of political stances, events, and forms of order. Topics addressed include political rhetoric and ritual, political communication and publics, discrimination and hierarchy, language and the legitimation of authority, as well as the role of language in nationalism, state formation, and in other sociopolitical movements like feminism and diasporic communities. Since this course has the good fortune of coinciding with the 2012 U.S. Presidential election, we will make significant use of campaign rhetorics as a means of illustrating and exploring various themes.

ANTHV3873SEMLanguage and PoliticsScott, Stephen4M 2:10pm-4:00pm

ANTH V3921: Anticolonialism
Scott, David; 4 credits; M 11:00am-12:50pm (SEM)

Through a careful exploration of the argument and style of three vivid anticolonial texts, C.L.R. James' The Black Jacobins, Aimé Césaire's Discourse on Colonialism, Albert Memmi's Colonizer and Colonized, and Frantz Fanon's The Wretched of the Earth, this course aims to inquire into the construction of the image of colonialism and its projected aftermaths established in anti-colonial discourse.

ANTHV3921SEMAnticolonialismScott, David4M 11:00am-12:50pm

ANTH V3922: The Emergence of State Society
D'Altroy, Terence; 4 credits; MW 10:10am-11:25am (COL)

The creation of the earliest states out of simpler societies was a momentous change in human history. This course examines major theories proposed to account for that process, including population pressure, warfare, urbanism, class conflict, technological innovation, resource management, political conflict and cooperation, economic specialization and exchange, religion/ideology, and information processing.

ANTHV3922COLThe Emergence of State SocietyD'Altroy, Terence4MW 10:10am-11:25am

ANTH V3980: Nationalism
Chaterjee, Partha; 4 credits; T 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

This course will cover the basic readings in the contemporary debate over nationalism. It will cover different disciplinary approaches and especially look at recent studies of nationalism in the formerly colonial world as well as in the industrial West. The readings will offer a mix of both theoretical and empirical studies. The readings include the following: 1) Eric Hobsbawn: Nationalism since 1700; 2) Ernest Gillner: Nations ans Nationalism; 3) Benedict Anderson: Imagined Communities; 4) Antony Smith: The Ethnic Origins of Nations; 5) Linda Coley: Britons; 6) Peter Sahlins: Boundaries and 7) Partha Chatterjee; The Nation and Its Fragments. Prerequisite: intended for seniors but not necessarily anthropology majors.

ANTHV3980SEMNationalismChaterjee, Partha4T 2:10pm-4:00pm

ANTH G4116: "Who Cares"
Fennell, Catherine; 3 credits; T 6:10pm-8:00pm (SEM)

This seminar examines the distribution and obligations of care under late liberalism. We work from classical approaches to human sentiment (e.g. Hume, Adam Smith) to explore the relationship of forms of care {management, empathy) to different modes of statecraft. In particular we examine links between imperial colonialism and liberal democracy in terms of different techniques of administering social difference (e.g. race, multiculturalism, class, population, ...). We critically investigate the role of the discipline of anthropology within this rubric and read several ethnographies that dwell on the interrelation of care and vulnerability. Across tbe course, we scrutinize what types of subjects care, for whom, and to what effect.

ANTHG4116SEM"Who Cares"Fennell, Catherine3T 6:10pm-8:00pm

ANTH G4390: Borders and Boundaries
Lomnitz, Claudio; 3 credits; T 4:10pm-6:00pm (SEM)

This graduate seminar focuses on the relationship between international borders and social boundaries within national societies. It has as its premise a double paradox of contemporary life: the hardening of ethnic and racial boundaries at a time when goods and information flow across national borders quite freely; and the racialization of social relations at a time when racial theories lack scientific prestige, and racial categories have become conspicuously unstable. The seminar explores anthropological, historical, political and aesthetic dimensions of the relationship between national borders and social boundaries in a comparative context, and develops a conceptual foundation for analysis of the relationship between borders and boundaries.

ANTHG4390SEMBorders and BoundariesLomnitz, Claudio3T 4:10pm-6:00pm

CSER V3120: Historical Rituals in Latin America
Lomnitz, Claudio; 3 credits; TR 10:10am-11:25am (LEC)

Anthropologists and historians of literacy and communication have emphasized the reliance on multivocal imagery in the organization of social and political life in Latin America. Historically, the salient role of image and of ritual in political ritual was fed by the chasm between literate and illiterate segments of the population. During the twentieth century, however, the rise of mass politics on one hand, and television and other visual media on the other, gave a new lease on the vibrant relevance of historical ritual and myth in local polticial life. This course explores the role of religious and secular ritual and myth in framing historical processes. It makes special emphasis on the use of Catholic ritual, imagery, and mythology in the European conquest and colonization of the continent, and in revolution, nationbuilding, civic life, and sexual politics, since the 19tr century.

CSERV3120LECHistorical Rituals in Latin AmericaLomnitz, Claudio3TR 10:10am-11:25am

CSER W3905: Asian American & Psychology of Race
Han, Shinhee; 4 credits; W 11:00am-12:50pm (SEM)

This seminar provides an introduction to mental health issues for Asian Americans. In particular, it focuses on the psychology of Asian Americans as racial/ethnic minorities in the United States by exploring a number of key concepts: immigration, racialization, prejudice, family, identity, pathology, and loss. We will examine the development of identity in relation to self, family, college, and society. Quantitative investigation, qualitative research, psychology theories of multiculturalism, and Asian American literature will also be integrated into the course.

CSERW3905SEMAsian American & Psychology of RaceHan, Shinhee4W 11:00am-12:50pm

CSER W3923: Latino and Asian American Memoir
Handal, Nathalie; 4 credits; M 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEm)

In this class, we will explore Latino and Asian American memoir, focusing on themes of immigration and duality. How do we construct identity and homeland when we are ‘multiple’? How do we define ourselves and how do others define us? By reading some of the most challenging and exciting memoirs by Latino and Asian Americans, we will attempt to answer these questions and/or at least try to understand these transnational and multicultural experiences. This class combines the critical with the creative—students have to read and critic memoirs as well as write a final 10page nonfiction creative writing piece. *Students will also have the opportunity to speak to some Latino and Asian authors in class or via SKYPE. Students will be asked to prepare questions in advance for the author—whose work(s) we will have read and discussed. This usually arises interesting and thought-provoking conversations and debates. This 'Dialogue Series' within the class exposes students to a wide-range of voices and offers them a deeper understanding of the complexity of duality.

CSERW3923SEmLatino and Asian American MemoirHandal, Nathalie4M 2:10pm-4:00pm

ECON BC3011: Inequality and Poverty
Timmer, Ashley; 3 credits; TR 11:40am-12:55pm (LEC)

Conceptualization and measurement of inequality and poverty, poverty traps and distributional dynamics, economics and politics of public policies, in both poor and rich countries.

ECONBC3011LECInequality and PovertyTimmer, Ashley3TR 11:40am-12:55pm

ECON W4438: Economics of Race in the U.S.
O'Flaherty, Brendan; 3 credits; TR 4:10pm-5:25pm (LEC)

Prerequisites: STAT W1211, ECON W3211 and W3213. ECON W4400 is strongly recommended. What differences does race make in the U.S. economy? Why does it make these differences? Are these differences things we should be concerned about? If so, what should be done? Examines labor markets, housing markets, capital markets, crime, education, and the links among these markets. Both empirical and theoretical contributions are studied.

ECONW4438LECEconomics of Race in the U.S.O'Flaherty, Brendan3TR 4:10pm-5:25pm

ENGL W3400: African American Literature I
Griffin, Farah; 3 credits; TR 1:10pm-2:25pm (LEC)

An introduction to African American literary studies. In this first part of the historical survey, we will examine the origins of African American literature, explore the nineteenth century, and look at enactments of African American modernism during the period of the Harlem Renaissance. We will begin with the poetry of Phillis Wheatley and end with the fiction of Zora Neale Hurston. Along the way, writers include David Walker, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Langston Hughes, Mae Cowdery, and Claude McKay. This introductory course will cover a range of literary genres, even as we ask questions about what constitutes “genre” as African American literary history unfolds. Course requirements: mandatory class attendance and participation, two five-page essays and a final examination.

ENGLW3400LECAfrican American Literature IGriffin, Farah3TR 1:10pm-2:25pm

ENGL W3505: Gay and Lesbian Literature: Post-AIDS Literature
Robinson-Appels ; 4 credits; F 6:10pm-8:00pm (SEM)

Permission of the instructor. (Seminar). Seminal twentieth-century works are analyzed in terms of the formation of a modernist gay literary style, with references to the earlier history of homosexual literature. Close reading of authors from Europe and the United States, such as Mann, Proust, Baldwin, Cather, Anzaldua, Ashbery, Cavafy, Stein, Cixous, Pasolini, and Lorde. Discussion of lesbian and gay visual and performing artists in order to clarify literary themes of veiling, amplification, gesture, camp, and the body. The course will include lesbian and gay theory, in particular Foucault, Barthes, Butler, Sedgwick, Irigaray. The course also considers the newer, post-AIDS literary forms that congeal the most recent cultural knowledge of the continuing AIDS crisis. How do recent literary forms describe and define: 1.) the medicalization of AIDS, 2.) melancholy and mourning as a response, 3.) literatures of self-healing, 4.) the expressive portrayal of AIDS bodies, 5.) notions of individual vs. social immunity, 6.) the recent social history of immunology, 7.) the scarcity of socio-cultural critique of AIDS etiology, and 8.) the intermittent coverage of "living with AIDS" stories.

ENGLW3505SEMGay and Lesbian Literature: Post-AIDS LiteratureRobinson-Appels 4F 6:10pm-8:00pm

ENGL W3618: Native American Literature
Gamber, John; 4 credits; M 12:10pm-2:00pm (SEM)

This course will serve as a survey of Native American literature from the 1960s to the present. We will begin with some of the foundational novels of the Native American Renaissance beginning in the late 1960s, then moving to more contemporary Native-authored drama, poetry, and critical and theoretical essays. We will examine the ways that these Native authors represent themselves and their communities. Among these representations are didactic narratives designed to instruct outgroup, non-Native readers to Indian cultures, histories and practices. However, these texts are also in dialogue with a wide array of other texts from Native and non-Native authors. Moreover, and more interestingly, we will examine these narratives to understand them from the Indigenous practices that overturn implicit or presupposed aesthetic privileging of European traditions. Application instructions: E-mail Professor Gamber (jbg2134@columbia.edu) April 11 with the subject heading "Native American Literature seminar". In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list, from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

ENGLW3618SEMNative American LiteratureGamber, John4M 12:10pm-2:00pm

ENGL W3733: Seminar in American Literature and Culture: Dewey to Obama
Wallack, Nicole; 4 credits; T 11:00am-12:50pm (SEM)

In his 1837 address to the Phi Beta Cappa Society, Ralph Waldo Emerson asserts that the American scholar is "one, who raises himself from private considerations, and breathes and lives on public and illustrious thoughts. He is the world's eye. He is the world's heart." One hundred and seventy six years later, what does it mean for an American woman or man to take on the role of a public intellectual, or to be cast as one? In particular how have public intellectuals taken on the role to tell us unpleasant or complex truths about ourselves? With the election of Barack Obama to the presidency in 2008, these questions acquired a renewed visibility and weight for Americans, who heard him offer his views on race in his speech "A More Perfect Union." In this course, we will consider how writers from many quarters of American life have extended and complicated Emerson's notion of the public intellectual. We will examine essays, speeches, open letters, and recordings by public intellectuals from the Progressive Era until the present. This course is organized to dramatize both the work of public intellectuals, and to engage with theories regarding the definition and roles of public intellectuals. In particular, we will consider how the essay as a genre adapted formally to the needs of changing publics. Course texts will include work by Randolph Bourne, E. B. White, James Baldwin, Martin Luther King, Jr., Susan Sontag, Edward Said, Cornell West, Barbara Ehrenreich, Rachel Carson, Andrew Sullivan, and Barack Obama. To help us to discuss key issues and themes, we will read short excerpts from cultural theorists on intellectual history such as John Dewey, Richard Posner, bell hooks, Richard Hofstadter, and Cornell West who have posed questions about the rights and responsibilities of the public intellectual inside and outside of academic contexts.

ENGLW3733SEMSeminar in American Literature and Culture: Dewey to ObamaWallack, Nicole4T 11:00am-12:50pm

ENGL W3917: Topics in Literature and Society: Writing Disability
Baswell, Christopher; 3 credits; MW 10:10am-11:25am (LEC)

Description not currently available

ENGLW3917LECTopics in Literature and Society: Writing DisabilityBaswell, Christopher3MW 10:10am-11:25am

HIST W4669: Dictatorship that Changed Brazil
Ridenti, Marcelo; 4 credits; W 9:00am-10:50am (SEM)

This course seeks to analyze the period of military dictatorship in Brazil (1964-1985), supported by many civilians as well. Different conjunctures will be studied, since the years before the coup of 1964 until the process of democratization. The course aims to understand a paradox: the dictatorship was established in the name of democracy, allegedly threatened. The main hypothesis is that the paradox was due to the character of the conservative modernization of society imposed by the military regime and its civilian allies. The dictatorship had ambiguities and distinct phases, involving a complex set of political and military forces. The involvement with the modernization also implied the use of illegitimate brute force against its enemies, which allows to characterize the regime as a dictatorship, in spite of its democratic façade. Special attention will be given to the opponents of the order. The relationship between the dominant and the dominated, even in authoritarian regimes, must be understood not only based on confrontation and repression, but also on negotiation and concessions to the opponents, without which it is impossible to build a base of legitimacy. The topics will be examined in the light of concepts such as conservative modernization (Barrington Moore Jr.), legitimate domination (Weber), hegemony (Gramsci), among others. The course also introduces students to critical interpretations of society and politics produced by Brazilian and Brazilianist historians and social scientists. Field(s): LA

HIST W4669SEMDictatorship that Changed BrazilRidenti, Marcelo4W 9:00am-10:50am

HIST W3398: Politics of Terror: French Revolution
Coleman, Charly; 3 credits; TR 4:10pm-5:25pm (LEC)

This course examines the political culture of eighteenth-century France, from the final decades of the Bourbon monarchy to the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte. Among our primary aims will be to explore the origins of the Terror and its relationship to the Revolution as a whole. Other topics we will address include the erosion of the king's authority in the years leading up to 1789, the fall of the Bastille, the Constitutions of 1791 and 1793, civil war in the Vendée, the militarization of the Revolution, the dechristianization movement, attempts to establish a new Revolutionary calendar and civil religion, and the sweeping plans for moral regeneration led by Robespierre and his colleagues in 1793-1794. Field(s): MEU

HISTW3398LECPolitics of Terror: French RevolutionColeman, Charly3TR 4:10pm-5:25pm

HIST BC3401: Politics of Crime and Policing in the U.S.
Vaz, Matthew; 3 credits; TR 6:10pm-7:25pm (LEC)

Description not currently available.

HISTBC3401LECPolitics of Crime and Policing in the U.S.Vaz, Matthew3TR 6:10pm-7:25pm

HIST BC3403: Mexican Migration in the U.S.
TBA; 3 credits; TR 10:10am-11:25am (LEC)

Description to be determined

HISTBC3403LECMexican Migration in the U.S.TBA3TR 10:10am-11:25am

HIST BC3423: Constitution- Historical Perspective
Sloan, Herbert E; 3 credits; TR 2:40pm-3:55pm (LEC)

The development of constitutional doctrine, 1787 to the present.  The Constitution as an experiment in Republicanism; states’ rights and the Civil War amendments; freedom of contract and its opponents; the emergence of civil liberties; New Deal intervention and the crisis of the Court; and the challenge of civil rights.

HISTBC3423LECConstitution- Historical Perspective Sloan, Herbert E3TR 2:40pm-3:55pm

HIST W3950: Social History of American Public Health
Colgrove, James; 3 credits; TR 4:10pm-5:25pm (SEM)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an historical understanding of the role public health has played in American history. The underlying assumptions are that disease, and the ways we define disease, are simultaneously reflections of social and cultural values, as well as important factors in shpaing those values. Also, it is maintained that the environments that we build determine the ways we live and die. The dread infectious and acute diseases in the nineteenth century, the chronic, degenerative conditions of the twentieth and the new, vaguely understood conditions rooted in a changing chemical and human-made environment are emblematic of the societies we created. Among the questions that will be addressed are: How does the health status of Americans reflect and shape our history? How do ideas about health reflect broader attitudes and values in American history and cutlure? How does the American experience with pain, disability, and disease affect our actions and lives? What are the responsibilities of the state and of the individual in preserving health? How have American institutions--from hospitals to unions to insurance companies--been shaped by changing longevity, experience with disability and death?

HISTW3950SEMSocial History of American Public HealthColgrove, James3TR 4:10pm-5:25pm

HIST W4206: Power and Violence in Russian History
Antonov, Sergei; 4 credits; W 11:00am-12:50pm (SEM)

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission is required; preference will be given to majors and concentrators, seniors and juniors. Each meeting of this seminar will consider a particular way in which power was structured and exercised in Imperial and Soviet Russia, looking at violence in its various manifestations, at the role of law in containing it, and at the changing ways Russia's rulers represented their personal authority. Through a combination of novels, memoirs, and selected scholarly texts, we will also examine Russians' traditional obsession with war and all things military; the development of modern terrorism, secret police, and political repression; and power hierarchies within families and communities.

HISTW4206SEMPower and Violence in Russian HistoryAntonov, Sergei4W 11:00am-12:50pm

HIST BC4870: Gender and Migration: A Global Perspective
Moya, Jose; 4 credits; T 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

Explores migration as a gendered process and what factors account for migratory differences by gender across place and time; including labor markets, education demographic and family structure, gender ideologies, religion, government regulations and legal status, and intrinsic aspects of the migratory flow itself.

HISTBC4870SEMGender and Migration: A Global PerspectiveMoya, Jose4T 2:10pm-4:00pm

HIST BC4999: Transnational Feminism
Nadasen, Premilla; 4 credits; W 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

Description not currently available

HISTBC4999SEMTransnational FeminismNadasen, Premilla4W 2:10pm-4:00pm

HSEA W4888: Women and Gender in Korea
Kim, Jungwon; 4 credits; R 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

While the rise of women's history and feminist theory in the 1960s and 1970s fostered more general reevaluations of social and cultural history in the West, such progressions have been far more modest in Korean history. To introduce one of the larger challenges in current Korean historiography, this course explores the experiences, consciousness and representations of women Korea at home and abroad from premodern times to the present. Historical studies of women and gender in Korea will be analyzed in conjunction with theories of Western women's history to encourage new methods of rethinking "patriarchy" within the Korean context. By tracing the lives of women from various socio-cultural aspects and examining the multiple interactions between the state, local community, family and individual, women's places in the family and in society, their relationships with one another and men, and the evolution of ideas about gender and sexuality throughout Korea's complicated past will be reexamined through concrete topics with historical specificity and as many primary sources as possible. With understanding dynamics of women's lives in Korean society, this class will build an important bridge to understand the construction of New Women in early twentieth-century Korea, when women from all walks of life had to accommodate their "old-style" predecessors and transform themselves to new women, as well as the lives of contemporary Korean women. This will be very much a reading-and-discussion course. Lectures will review the readings in historical perspective and supplement them. The period to be studied ranges from the pre-modern time up to the turn of twentieth century, with special attention to the early modern period.

HSEAW4888SEMWomen and Gender in KoreaKim, Jungwon4R 2:10pm-4:00pm

PHIL G4260: Kant's Ethics
Kitcher, Patricia; 3 credits; M 4:10pm-6:00pm (LEC)

The course will trace (and evaluate) central themes in Kant's ethical theory through his major texts, the Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals, The Critique of Practical Reason, the Metaphysics of Morals, and relevant parts of Religion within the Bounds of Mere Reason. Themes include the role of reason in moral evaluation and decision, freedom and autonomy, moral egalitarianism, moral idealism, moral dilemmas, and Kant's idea of the good.

PHILG4260LECKant's EthicsKitcher, Patricia3M 4:10pm-6:00pm

POLS W3170: Nationalism, Republicanism and Cosmpolitanism
Kimpell, Jessica; 3 credits; MW 10:10am-11:25am (LEC)

Do we have obligations to our co-nationals that we do not owe to others? Might our loyalties or obligations to our fellow citizens be based on a commitment to shared political principles and common public life rather than national identity? Do we have basic duties that are owed equally to human beings everywhere, regardless of national or political affiliation? Do our commitments to co-nationals or compatriots conflict with those duties we might owe to others, and if so, to what extent? Is cosmopolitanism based on rationality and patriotism based on passion? This course will explore these questions from the perspectives of nationalism, republicanism and cosmopolitanism. We will consider historical works from Herder, Rousseau, Kant, Fichte, Mill, Mazzini and Renan; and more contemporary contributions from Berlin, Miller, Canovan, Mac Intyre, Viroli, Sandel, Pettit, Habermas, Nussbaum, Appiah, and Pogge, among others.

POLSW3170LECNationalism, Republicanism and CosmpolitanismKimpell, Jessica3MW 10:10am-11:25am

POLS V3401: Democracy and Dictatorship Europe
Berman, Sheri; 3 credits; MW 11:40am-12:55pm (LEC)

Description not currently available

POLSV3401LECDemocracy and Dictatorship EuropeBerman, Sheri3MW 11:40am-12:55pm

POLS W3921: 20th Century African-American Thought
Harris, Fredrick; 4 credits; (SEM)

This course surveys the political and social thought of African-Americans during the 20th century.  It will consider the social, political, and historical context of political ideologies in black communities, from the standpoint of early thinkers and activists such as W.E.B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, and Ida B. Wells-Barnett to post-World War II thinkers such as Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, bell hooks, Cornel West, among others.  The course will critically assess such perspectives as liberalism, nationalism, feminism, conservatism, and Marxism as considered by important black thinkers of the era.  The course approaches the study of African Americans political and social thought from theoretical and historical perspectives.

POLSW3921SEM20th Century African-American ThoughtHarris, Fredrick4

POLS W3921: American Politics Seminar: Politics of Immigration
de la Garza, Rodolfo; 4 credits; M 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

Description not currently available

POLSW3921SEMAmerican Politics Seminar: Politics of Immigrationde la Garza, Rodolfo4M 2:10pm-4:00pm

POLS W3951: Comparative Politics Seminar: Democracy and Regime Change
Kasara, Kimuli; 4 credits; M 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

Description not currently available

POLSW3951SEMComparative Politics Seminar: Democracy and Regime ChangeKasara, Kimuli4M 2:10pm-4:00pm

POLS G4610: Recent Continental Political Thought
Cohen, Jean; 3 credits; W 2:10pm-4:00pm (LEC)

This course will compare and contrast the theories of the political, the state, freedom, democracy, sovereignty and law, in the works of the following key 20th and 21st century continental theorists: Arendt, Castoriadis, Foucault, Habermas, Kelsen, Lefort, Schmitt, and Weber. It will be taught in seminar format.

POLSG4610LECRecent Continental Political ThoughtCohen, Jean3W 2:10pm-4:00pm

PSYC BC3153: Psychology and Women
McKenna, Wendy; 4 credits; M 4:10p - 6:00p (SEM)

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and at least two psychology courses. Permission of the instructor required for majors other than Psychology or Women's Studies. Enrollment limited to 20 students. Examines how female experience is and has been understood by psychologists. Through an understanding of gender as a social construction and issues raised by the intersections of gender, sexuality, class, and race, the course will analyze assumptions about what causes us to be gendered and about how being gendered affects behavior.

PSYCBC3153SEMPsychology and WomenMcKenna, Wendy4M 4:10p - 6:00p

PSYC BC3166: Social Conflict
Heur, Larry; 4 credits; R 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

Description not currently available

PSYCBC3166SEMSocial ConflictHeur, Larry4R 2:10pm-4:00pm

PSYC BC3379: Psychology of Streotyping and Prejudice
Stroessner, Steven; 4 credits; W 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

Review of current literature from experimental social psychology pertaining to stereotyping and prejudice. Topics include: functions and costs of stereotyping, the formation and maintenance of stereotypes, and stereotype change. Recent research concerning the role of cognitive processes in intergroup perception will be emphasized.

PSYCBC3379SEMPsychology of Streotyping and PrejudiceStroessner, Steven4W 2:10pm-4:00pm

PSYC G4615: Psychology of Culture and Diversity
Purdie-Vaughns; 4 credits; T 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

A comprehensive examination of how culture and diversity shape psychological processes. The class will explore psychological and political underpinnings of culture and diversity, emphasizing social psychological approaches. Topics include culture and self, cuture and social cognition, group and identity formation, science of diversity, stereotyping, prejudice, and gender. Applications to real-world phenomena discussed.

PSYCG4615SEMPsychology of Culture and DiversityPurdie-Vaughns4T 2:10pm-4:00pm

RELI V3311: Islam in Post-Colonial World
Haider, Najam I; 3 credits; TR 1:10pm-2:25pm (LEC)

This course focuses on the multiple manifestations of the Islamic vision in the modern world. It begins with a survey of core Muslim beliefs before shifting to an examination of the impact of colonization and secular modernity on contemporary formulations of Islam.

RELIV3311LECIslam in Post-Colonial WorldHaider, Najam I3TR 1:10pm-2:25pm

RELI W4910: Religion and International Development
Rupp, George; 4 credits; R 2:10pm-4:00pm (SEM)

Both the theory and the practice of international relief and development raise a host of normative as well as descriptive issues. This course will examine recent analyses of the impact of assistance programs on the social and cultural conditions in the developing world. While the focus will be on the economic and political developments, the role of religious communities will also be considered (on both the giving and the receiving ends of the aid transactions).

RELIW4910SEMReligion and International DevelopmentRupp, George4R 2:10pm-4:00pm

SOCI BC3911: The Social Contexts of U.S. Immigration Law and Policy
Salyer, John; 4 credits; R 4:10pm-6:00pm (SEM)

Examines the historical and contemporary social, economic, and political factors that shape immigration law and policy along with the social consequences of those laws and policies.  Addresses the development and function of immigration law and aspects of the immigration debate including unauthorized immigration, anti-immigration sentiments, and critiques of immigration policy.

SOCIBC3911SEMThe Social Contexts of U.S. Immigration Law and PolicySalyer, John4R 4:10pm-6:00pm

SOCI BC3920: Advanced Topics in Gender and Sexuality
Bernstein, Elizabeth; 4 credits; T 11:00am-12:50pm (SEM)

Description not currently available

SOCIBC3920SEMAdvanced Topics in Gender and SexualityBernstein, Elizabeth4T 11:00am-12:50pm

SOCI W3930: Immigration and Ethnicity in Israel
Cohen, Yinon; 4 credits; T 4:10pm-6:00pm (SEM)

This seminar will focus on migration patterns to and from Israel and their effect on the ethnic composition and cleavages in Israeli society. We will discuss Jewish immigration and emigration in the pre-state period, Arab forced migration in 1948, Jewish immigration to Israel until the 1967 war, and migration patterns from the late 1960s until the present. In addition, we will discuss Jewish emigration from Israel, which is viewed as a major social problem. The focus will be on the number of emigrants, their composition, the causes for emigration, return migration, and on the question of the brain drain from contemporary Israel.

SOCIW3930SEMImmigration and Ethnicity in IsraelCohen, Yinon4T 4:10pm-6:00pm

SOCI W3980: Immigrant New York
Tran, Van; 4 credits; W 10:10am-12:00pm (SEM)

How has immigration transformed New York City? What are the major ethnic groups in the city? How are immigrants and their U.S.-born children incorporated into the city's schools, workplaces and neighborhoods? How will their integration reshape patterns of ethnic and racial inequality in the city? This course will focus on New York City as a case study to highlight how immigration has transformed the city's demographic, political, socioeconomic and spatial landscape.

SOCIW3980SEMImmigrant New YorkTran, Van4W 10:10am-12:00pm

SOCI G4138: Religious Idenitity and Politics - Middle East/South Asia
Barkey, Karen; 3 credits; W 2:10pm-4:00pm (LEC)

This is a comparative course intended to bridge areas and disciplines in the social sciences. Both the Middle East and South Asia are areas of democratization and conflict around issues of ethnic, religious, and communal issues. The pull and push of democratic politics and conflict along communal dimensions can be studied fron an historical as well as comparative perspective, by looking at India, Pakistan, Turkey, Egypt, (and Syria, and Iraq) to understand first the historical legacies of communalisms and then the impact of religious and ethnic politics as they developed in the post democratic era.

SOCIG4138LECReligious Idenitity and Politics - Middle East/South AsiaBarkey, Karen3W 2:10pm-4:00pm

SOCI G4370: Processes of Stratification and Inequality
Spilerman, Seymour; 3 credits; T 4:10pm-6:00pm (SEM)

The nature of opportunity in American society; the measurement of inequality; trends in income and wealth inequality; issues of poverty and poverty policy; international comparisons.

SOCIG4370SEMProcesses of Stratification and InequalitySpilerman, Seymour3T 4:10pm-6:00pm

URBS V3550: Community Building
Abzug, Liz; 3 credits; W 4:10pm-6:00pm (LEC)

Community building has emerged as an important approach to creating an economic base, reducing poverty and improving the quality of life in urban neighborhoods. In this course, students examine the methods, strategies, and impact of community building on the economic, social, and political development of urban neighborhoods.

URBSV3550LECCommunity BuildingAbzug, Liz3W 4:10pm-6:00pm

URBS V3565: Cities in Developing Countries
Gladstone, Susan; 3 credits; MW 1:10pm-2:25pm (LEC)

Examination of cities in developing countries, with a focus on environment, employment, and housing. Four cases will be studied: Sao Paulo, Brazil; Johannesburg, South Africa; Bombay, India; and Shanghai, China. We will consider urbanization patterns and the attendant issues, the impact of global economic trends, and governmental and non-governmental responses.

URBSV3565LECCities in Developing CountriesGladstone, Susan3MW 1:10pm-2:25pm

URBS V3920: Social Entrepreneurship
Kamber, Thomas; 4 credits; M 6:10pm-8:00pm (SEM)

Introduction to the main concepts and processes associated with the creation of new social enterprises, policies, programs, and organizations; criteria for assessing business ventures sponsored by non-profits and socially responsible initiatives undertaken by corporations; specific case studies using New York City as a laboratory.

URBSV3920SEMSocial EntrepreneurshipKamber, Thomas4M 6:10pm-8:00pm

WMST BC1050: Women and Health
Young, R. ; 3 credits; TR 4:10pm-5:25pm (LEC)

Interdisciplinary introduction emphasizing interaction of biological and sociocultural influences on women's health, and exploring health disparities among women as well as between women and men. Current biomedical knowledge presented with empirical critiques of research and medical practice in specific areas such as occupational health, cardiology, sexuality, infectious diseases, reproduction, etc.

WMSTBC1050LECWomen and HealthYoung, R. 3TR 4:10pm-5:25pm

This list is for the Columbia Undergraduate Human Rights Concentration. An informal list of additional human rights and related courses is maintained by the Institute for the Study of Human Rights (ISHR). Courses on ISHR's list do not necessarily fulfill the requirements of any human rights program.

 

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Undergraduate Human Rights Courses
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